Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Absolute Beginner season 1, lesson 24, Expanding Your Danish Vocabulary AND Having Your Mouth Full At The Same Time. I’m Gina.
Anna: Hej! And I’m Anna.
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn to ask, ‘how do you say (something)’ in another language.
Anna: This is a good way to expand your Danish vocabulary.
Gina: Let’s get started!
Anna: The conversation takes place at a park, and it’s between Emma, William, and Peter, who are enjoying some snacks.
Gina: The speakers are friends, and they’re speaking standard Danish. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Emma: Mmm.
William: Gem noget til os!
Peter: Hvordan siger man ‘crisps’ på dansk?
(gulp)
Emma: Det er nemt! Chips.
Peter: Hvad er ‘french fries’ så på dansk?
William: Pomfritter.
Gina: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Emma: Mmm.
William: Gem noget til os!
Peter: Hvordan siger man ‘crisps’ på dansk?
(gulp)
Emma: Det er nemt! Chips.
Peter: Hvad er ‘french fries’ så på dansk?
William: Pomfritter.
Gina: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Emma: Mmm.
Gina: Mmm.
William: Gem nogle til os!
Gina: Save some for us!
Peter: Hvordan siger man ‘crisps’ på dansk?
Gina: How do you say "crisps" in Danish?
Emma: Det er nemt! Chips.
Gina: That’s easy! Chips.
Peter: Hvad er ‘french fries’ så på dansk?
Gina: What is "French fries" in Danish then?
William: Pomfritter.
Gina: Pomfritter.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Okay, so snacks seem to be a running theme in this series! Can you tell us more about Danish snacks?
Anna: Well, a summer favorite is koldskål which literally means “cold bowl.”
Gina: What’s that?
Anna: It’s a cold dessert made of buttermilk, eggs, and sugar. Then you put whole macaroons on top or you crumble them up and sprinkle them on top.
Gina: Sounds perfect for warm summer evenings.
Anna: If you're more into salty snacks, you should try some of the crispy crackling that you can buy in bags pretty much anywhere.
Gina: Is it as good as the one from pork roast?
Anna: Not quite. Nothing beats homemade crackling.
Gina: Of course!
Anna: And if you dare, you should try salty liquorice.
Gina: Apparently it’s very nice once you get used to that burning sort of sensation on your tongue.
Anna: Danes love this type of liquorice!
Gina: It sounds like it takes some getting used to! Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Gina: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Anna: gemme [natural native speed]
Gina: hide, save, keep
Anna: gemme [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: gemme [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: noget [natural native speed]
Gina: some; something
Anna: noget [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: noget [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: hvordan siger man [natural native speed]
Gina: how do you say?
Anna: hvordan siger man [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: hvordan siger man [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: på dansk [natural native speed]
Gina: in Danish
Anna: på dansk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: på dansk [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: nem [natural native speed]
Gina: easy
Anna: nem [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nem [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: hvordan [natural native speed]
Gina: how
Anna: hvordan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: hvordan [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: sige [natural native speed]
Gina: say, tell
Anna: sige [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: sige [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: man [natural native speed]
Gina: you, one, we, they
Anna: man [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: man [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: hvad er [natural native speed]
Gina: what is?, what are?
Anna: hvad er [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: hvad er [natural native speed]
And Last:
Anna: pomfritter [natural native speed]
Gina: French fries, chips
Anna: pomfritter [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: pomfritter [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What’s first?
Anna: First is gemme. [pause] Gemme.
Gina: This verb means “hide,” “save,” and “keep.”
Anna: You can use gemme when you’re hiding yourself or something else, and when you’re saving money or keeping money somewhere.
Gina: So basically it’s used just like in English. What’s next?
Anna: Noget. [pause] Noget. This is the neuter form of the pronoun nogen, which means “some” or “something”.
Gina: Like in English, it's used when you’re talking about an indefinite quantity of something.
Anna: For example, Der er noget i luften. [pause] Der er noget i luften.
Gina: This means “There is something in the air.”
Anna: Der means there,” er is the verb be and means “is,” noget means “something,” i is the preposition “in,” and luften means “the air.”
Gina: Can you give us another example?
Anna: Sure. Noget te er meget godt, andet er ikke. [pause] Noget te er meget godt, andet er ikke.
Gina: This means “Some tea is very good, others aren't.”
Anna: Breaking it down, Noget in this case means “some,” te means “tea,” er means “are,” meget means “very,” godt is the t-form of “good,” andet is the neuter-form of anden and means “other,” er means “are,” and ikke means “not.”
Gina: Great. What do we have next?
Anna: Next we have pomfritter. [pause] pomfritter.
Gina: This is the common gender noun that means “French fries” or “chips.”
Anna: It is of French origin, so you can also use the French version, pomme frite.
Gina: Both spellings are accepted and correct. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn to ask how to say something in another language.
Anna: In Danish, you say Hvordan siger man [something] på dansk?
Gina: This means “How do you say [something] in Danish?”
Anna: Breaking this down, Hvordan means “how,” siger is the verb “say” in present tense, man is the pronoun “you” or “one,” and på dansk is “in Danish."
Gina: The phrase is easy to use, and you simply place the word or sentence you want to know how to say between the pronoun man and på dansk.
Anna: That’s right.
Gina: Once again please.
Anna: Hvordan siger man [something] på dansk?
Gina: Let’s hear an example with the English phrase “a big bird.”
Anna: Hvordan siger man ‘a big bird’ på dansk? [pause] Hvordan siger man ‘a big bird’ på dansk?
Gina: This means “How do you say “a big bird” in Danish?”
Anna: “A big bird” is en stor fugl in Danish, just for the record.
Gina: Oh, great. Thanks.
Anna: Another way of asking how to say something in Danish is Hvad er [something] på dansk?
Gina: This means “What is [something] in Danish?”
Anna: Hvad means “what,” er is the verb “be” in present tense, and på dansk means “in Danish,” of course.
Gina: You simply place the word or sentence you want to ask about between the verb and på dansk. Let’s hear it again.
Anna: Hvad er [something] på dansk?
Gina: Can you give us an example too?
Anna: Hvad er ‘rainbow’ på dansk]? [pause] Hvad er ‘rainbow’ på dansk?
Gina: This means “What is ‘rainbow’ in Danish?”
Anna: And just for the record, “rainbow” is regnbue in Danish.
Gina: There’s a third way to ask, isn’t there?
Anna: Yes, you can say Hvad hedder [something] på dansk? [pause] Hvad hedder [something] på dansk?
Gina: This means “What is [something] called in Danish?”
Anna: Hvad means “what,” hedder is the verb “be called” in present tense, and på dansk means “in Danish.”
Gina: Let’s have an example.
Anna: Hvad hedder ‘a bedroom’ på dansk? [pause] Hvad hedder ‘a bedroom’ på dansk?
Gina: This means “What is “a bedroom” called in Danish?”
Anna: Yes, and it’s soveværelse by the way!
Gina: Good to know!
Anna: So basically, you always place the word or sentence you want to ask about before på dansk, or “in Danish.”
Gina: Yes, and as you’ve probably guessed, you simply change dansk to another language if necessary.
Anna: That’s right.

Outro

Gina: Okay, listeners, that’s all for now.
Anna: Check out the lesson notes for more information.
Gina: Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Hej hej!

4 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Listeners! Have you ever tried Danish snacks?

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:03 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi John miko.


Thanks for your question. We apologize for the late response.


In some cases, "du" and "man" are interchangeable like when "you" refers to an anonymous third person, everyone and no one at the same time. "Man" comes from German and is quite practical, cause then one is not in doubt. With "du", as with the English "you", confusion can occur: "Do you mean me?", "No no, I meant "you" as in anybody". For that very reason, I recommend you to use "man" in such cases.

In cases of second person singular, "du" is the correct word and "man" is not an option.


Let us know if you have any further questions.


Best


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

John miko
Wednesday at 08:20 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


Why do i feel like I am being ignored in the comment section. Couple of times now and no response?

John miko
Monday at 04:32 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


Unskyld, Jeg har et spørgsmål.


Hvornar bruger du "Man" rather than "Du"?


Mange Tak