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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 12 - Making a Complaint in Danish
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 12 - Making a Complaint in Danish. Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe food in Danish as well as some useful restaurant phrases. The conversation takes place at a café.
Anna: It's between Nicholas and Stine.
Eric: The speakers are strangers. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Niklas: Undskyld, min bøf er for rød.
Stine: Nå, det beklager jeg meget. Nu skal jeg bestille en ny til dig.
Niklas: Tak. Sovsen er også en smule kold.
Stine: Åh, det er jeg ked af.
Niklas: Men kartoflerne er perfekte.
Stine: Det var godt. Hvad med vinen?
Niklas: Den smager også godt.
Stine: Godt. Du får et glas til på husets regning.
Niklas: Mange tak!
Stine: Det manglede bare.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Niklas: Undskyld, min bøf er for rød.
Stine: Nå, det beklager jeg meget. Nu skal jeg bestille en ny til dig.
Niklas: Tak. Sovsen er også en smule kold.
Stine: Åh, det er jeg ked af.
Niklas: Men kartoflerne er perfekte.
Stine: Det var godt. Hvad med vinen?
Niklas: Den smager også godt.
Stine: Godt. Du får et glas til på husets regning.
Niklas: Mange tak!
Stine: Det manglede bare.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Niklas: Undskyld, min bøf er for rød.
Nicholas: Excuse me, my steak is too red.
Stine: Nå, det beklager jeg meget. Nu skal jeg bestille en ny til dig.
Stine: Oh, I am very sorry about that. I will order a new one for you.
Niklas: Tak. Sovsen er også en smule kold.
Nicholas: Thank you. The sauce is also a little cold.
Stine: Åh, det er jeg ked af.
Stine: Oh, I'm sorry.
Niklas: Men kartoflerne er perfekte.
Nicholas: But the potatoes are perfect.
Stine: Det var godt. Hvad med vinen?
Stine: Good. What about the wine?
Niklas: Den smager også godt.
Nicholas: It tastes good, too.
Stine: Godt. Du får et glas til på husets regning.
Stine: Good. You will get another glass on the house.
Niklas: Mange tak!
Nicholas: Thank you very much!
Stine: Det manglede bare.
Stine: It’s only right.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, do Danes complain often?
Anna: Actually many Danes always have something to complain about. However, it doesn't mean that they do it in public. For example, if they are not satisfied with the food or the service at a restaurant, most customers still won't complain directly to the staff. They would rather complain somewhere else like on social media sites and other digital platforms, or to their friends and family.
Eric: But if we want to complain on the spot at a restaurant, what should we do?
Anna: Please do it in a polite manner. That way the staff will be more likely to do their best to make up for whatever you are complaining about. If you're pleased with how your complaint was handled, it’s a good idea to make sure that the staff knows how much you appreciate their effort, even though they might had have been the source of your complaint in the first place.
Eric: I see. Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: bøf [natural native speed]
Eric: steak, beefsteak
Anna: bøf [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: bøf [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: for [natural native speed]
Eric: too
Anna: for [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: for [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: rød [natural native speed]
Eric: red
Anna: rød [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: rød [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at beklage [natural native speed]
Eric: to regret, to be sorry
Anna: at beklage [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at beklage [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: en smule [natural native speed]
Eric: a little, a bit
Anna: en smule [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: en smule [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: perfekt [natural native speed]
Eric: perfect
Anna: perfekt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: perfekt [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at smage [natural native speed]
Eric: to taste
Anna: at smage [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at smage [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: på husets regning [natural native speed]
Eric: on the house
Anna: på husets regning [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: på husets regning [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at mangle [natural native speed]
Eric: to lack, to be short of, to be without, to be lacking, to be missing
Anna: at mangle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at mangle [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: bare [natural native speed]
Eric: just, simply, only, merely
Anna: bare [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: bare [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Anna: at beklage
Eric: which means “to regret,” or “to be sorry.”
Anna: Use this verb to express regret or that you are sorry to have done something unpleasant or wrong.
Eric: For example, for being troublesome or causing an inconvenience.
Anna: At beklage is also often used when you have to give someone a regrettable answer or message.
Eric: Another usage of the verb is to express disappointment or sadness due to the specific outcome of something.
Anna: But listeners, please note that you can't use at beklage to express sympathy when someone has passed away or something tragic has happened to someone.
Eric: What could we say in those cases?
Anna: det er jeg ked af,
Eric: which was introduced in another lesson and roughly means “I’m sorry about that.”
Anna: Or you can use the verb at kondolere
Eric: “to express one's sympathy.” Can you give us an example using the first keyword?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Beklager, du er ikke på listen.
Eric: “Sorry, you are not on the list.” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Anna: på husets regning
Eric: which means “on the house.”
Anna: På
Eric: can either be an adverb or a preposition and most often it means “on,” “at,” or “in.”
Anna: Husets is the noun hus in definite form in the genitive case,
Eric: meaning “the house's.”
Anna: Regning
Eric: is a noun and usually means “check.”
Anna: You will hear this phrase most often in a restaurant.
Eric: Just like in the dialogue, it is said by restaurant staff when they give something to a customer for free. Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, Kaffen er på husets regning.
Eric: “The coffee is on the house.” Okay, what's the last word?
Anna: bare
Eric: which means “just, or "only.”
Anna: Bare can either be an adverb or a conjunction.
Eric: You can use it to indicate that something or someone is no more than what it, he, or she is. It is also used as a trivializing reaction to a previous event.
Anna: Bare can also be used for making a command, a wish, a threat, or some other statement more urgent.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Eric: Han er bare en god ven.
Anna: “He is just a good friend.”
Eric: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use adjectives and adverbs to describe food in Danish, plus some useful restaurant phrases.
Anna: Let’s talk first about adjectives in Danish.
Eric: Just like in English, adjectives are used to describe nouns.
Anna: But in Danish, adjectives are usually conjugated according to number and definiteness, and can also be conjugated in comparison forms or degree.
Eric: Here is a sentence pattern for using adjectives to describe food...
Anna: noun, er, adjective
Eric: “noun, is or are, adjective.” For example,
Anna: Salaten er frisk.
Eric: “The salad is fresh.”
Anna: In this example, we’ve used the common gender noun salat in definite form meaning “the salad,” and the adjective frisk meaning “fresh.”
Eric: Now let’s use the same adjective, “fresh,”
Anna: frisk
Eric: to describe a neuter gender noun.
Anna: Alright, note that in these cases a -t is added to the adjective at the end.
Eric: For example,
Anna: Æblet er friskt.
Eric: “The apple is fresh.”
Anna: Here, frisk becomes friskt.
Eric: What if we conjugate the adjectives that are describing a plural noun?
Anna: Then an -e would be added at the end of the adjective.
Eric: For example,
Anna: Brødene er friske.
Eric: “The breads are fresh.”
Anna: Note how frisk is now friske.
Eric: Listeners, in the Lesson Notes we have information on how to form the comparative and superlative forms of Danish adjectives as well.
Anna: So make sure to read those notes!
Eric: Now, let’s talk about adverbs.
Anna: Adverbs are used to describe a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.
Eric: They typically express time, place, way, negation, or the opinion of the speaker.
Anna: Let’s focus on using the adverbs “a little” and “very” to describe food.
Eric: First listen to the sentence pattern for using an adverb to describe an adjective in Danish.
Anna: Use a noun, the verb “to be,” an adverb, and an adjective.
Eric: Using the adverb “a little,”
Anna: smule
Eric: We have
Anna: noun, er smule, adjective,
Eric: which means “noun is a little adjective.” Now here’s a sentence -
Anna: Vandet er en smule varmt.
Eric: “The water is a little warm.” Now let’s use the adverb “very.”
Anna: So a noun, er meget, adjective.
Eric: “noun is very adjective.” Now here’s a sample sentence.
Anna: Suppen er meget varm.
Eric: “The soup is very hot.” Another very useful adverb is “too,”
Anna: in Danish - for,
Eric: It is used in the same way as the previous adverbs “a little” and “very.” So, we would say..
Anna: noun er for adjective,
Eric: "noun is too adjective." As you can see, the way this Danish sentence is structured is identical to how it is structured in English.
Anna: In order to express that something is, for example, “too dry” or “too salty,”
Eric: you simply add the word “too”
Anna: ...which is for in Danish...
Eric: in front of an adjective. For example…
Anna: Brødet er for hårdt.
Eric: “The bread is too hard.”
Anna: A -t is added to the adjective hård because brød, meaning “bread,” is a neuter gender noun.
Eric: Here’s another example...
Anna: Maden er for kold.
Eric: “The food is too cold.”
Anna: Here mad, meaning “food,” is a common gender noun, so the adjective “cold” remains the same.
Eric: Now before we wrap up, let’s hear some useful phrases for a restaurant.
Anna: Sure, and don’t forget that you can find the whole list and some explanations in the Lesson Notes.
Eric: The first one is -
Anna: Jeg vil gerne bestille…
Eric: “I would like to order…” And after your order has come, you can say
Anna: Det smager godt.
Eric: “It tastes good.” What if you want some more?
Anna: Må jeg få en til?
Eric: “May I have one more?”

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

5 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Can you make a complaint in Danish? Practice in the comments!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:44 PM
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Hi Luca.


Thank you for commenting.


It's the word "til" that indicates that the person is asking for another glass. "Et glas til" or "en tur til".


Thanks for pointing out the error.


Have a nice day.


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Luca P. Gentile
Saturday at 06:21 AM
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Jeg taker samme som Klavs!


¨Du får et glas til på husets regning¨ = is this equal to another glass or just a glass?

I don´t see the word ´another´ in this sentence.


¨Bøfferne er for seje. ("The steaks is too tough.") ¨

Is ¨Bøfferne¨ plural? if so, why in the translation there is the word ¨is¨ and not ¨are¨?

Team DanishClass101.com
Tuesday at 02:28 AM
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Hej Klavs


Tak for den konstruktive feedback.

("Thank you for the constructive feedback.")


Vi sætter stor pris på idéer fra vores lyttere til, hvordan vi kan gøre lektionerne bedre i fremtiden.

("We truly appreciate ideas from our listeners on how we can improve the lessons in the future.")


Vi arbejder også på at sørge for bedre stemmeskuespillere til fremtidige lektioner.

("We are also working on getting better voice actors for future lessons.")


Jeg er helt enig med dig i, at Beginner Series-niveauet kan være for højt for nogle, der er på begynderstadiet.

("I agree with you that the level of the Beginner Series can be too high for some people learning Danish at a beginner's level.")

Dog er der også mange, der finder det passende eller endda for nemt.

("However, many also find it appropriate or even too easy.")

Det kan der selvfølgelig være mange grunde til.

("There can be several reasons for this, of course.")


Vores Advanced Audio Blogs består af mere dybdegående viden om bestemte emner, traditioner, begivenheder etc., da den kulturelle del ofte har lige så stor betydning som selve det at lære sproget for nogle.

("Our Advanced Audio Blogs consist of more in-depth information about specific topics, traditions, event, etc., because to some learning more about the culture is often just as important as learning the language.")

Lyttere kan også bruge monologerne til at vænne sig til at høre længere og mere sammenhængende tale og teste deres forståelse af, hvad der bliver sagt.

("Listeners can also use the monologues to get used to listening to longer and more continuous speech and to test their understanding of what is being said.")


Det er f.eks. ofte lettere at høre, hvornår en sætning slutter, og hvornår en ny sætning starter i, når der er tale om dialoger.

("For example, it is often easier to hear when a sentence ends and when a new sentence begins when listening to a dialogue.")

Derfor kan det for nogle være en god udfordring med en monolog, hvor man virkelig skal koncentrere sig om at lytte og forstå.

("Therefore, for some people a monologue can be a good challenge where you really have to concentrate on listening and understanding.")


Det er en god idé med længere samtaler til dem på Advanced-niveau, selv om det vil bryde med blogformattet. ("It is a good idea with longer dialogues for Advanced level learners, even though it would inconsistent with the blog format.")

Måske kan det lade sig gøre i senere sæsoner i Advanced-serien.

("It might be possible in later seasons of the Advanced series.")

Det ville bestemt være en god måde at blive endnu bedre til dansk på.

("It would definitely be a good way of becoming even better at Danish.")


Endnu engang tak for kommentaren. ("Again, thank you for your comment.")


Med venlig hilsen

("Kind regards,")


Amalie

Klavs
Tuesday at 11:43 AM
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Hi there,


First of all I want to say that I'm not here to create any drama. All in all I think you are doing a good job. I'm Danish and I have been listening to most of the lessons. The way the female voice actor speaks Danish during the conversation is really natural. If I met her in the streets that's pretty close to how everybody would talk. But the male voice actors are not good at all. Nobody speaks Danish like that. They sound like robots.

I have been listening to several of the other language programs and the first time the conversation takes place you are supposed to speak completely normal. It just sounds awkward when the male voice actors talk during the Danish conversations.

The best lesson so far is lesson 1 in the beginner series. It is a really nice conversation. It's very natural at a native Danish conversation speed. Thumbs up for that one!


Concerning the length of a conversation and the amount of information per lesson.

I think some of the conversations are slightly too long as a beginner series when I compare them to other language courses under the Innovative Language programs. Personally, I would change the difficulty level on some of them. It's just a suggestion. Or maybe make the conversations shorter. It makes it a lot easier to retain the information in each lesson. I'm not saying that every single language course under Innovative Language should be the same. I'm just saying that I personally feel that the difficulty level of the conversations seem too high for someone learning Danish at a beginner's level. This might just be a personal thing.


One last thing, in the future I hope you will add lessons for the advanced level and not just monologues about the monarchy and Danish Holidays. You can listen to the radio, read the newspaper, or read a book for that. Instead I think it could be really awesome if you had longer conversations for advanced learners. Three minutes or so. The next time you and your friends have a political discussion for example record it and ask them if you can use it here for the advanced learners. I'm just trying to throw ideas out there because it's more interesting listening to a conversation than somebody monologuing.


I wish you the best of luck with future everything.


Best regards.