Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 16 - Visiting a Danish Hairdresser
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 16 - Visiting a Danish Hairdresser. Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to give directions and instructions using the imperative mood. The conversation takes place at a hair salon.
Anna: It's between Simone and Camille.
Eric: The speakers are acquaintances. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Simone: Jeg vil gerne have klippet mine spidser.
Camille: Kun spidserne?
Simone: Nej, du må gerne klippe to centimeter af.
Camille: Okay, så gør jeg det.
Simone: Jeg skal også have dig til at farve mit hår.
Camille: Din sædvanlige farve?
Simone: Nej, jeg vil gerne have, du farver det en tone lysere.
Camille: Okay, jeg gør farven klar.
Simone: Og du skal ikke give mig lilla hår denne gang!
Camille: Bare tag det roligt.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Simone: Jeg vil gerne have klippet mine spidser.
Camille: Kun spidserne?
Simone: Nej, du må gerne klippe to centimeter af.
Camille: Okay, så gør jeg det.
Simone: Jeg skal også have dig til at farve mit hår.
Camille: Din sædvanlige farve?
Simone: Nej, jeg vil gerne have, du farver det en tone lysere.
Camille: Okay, jeg gør farven klar.
Simone: Og du skal ikke give mig lilla hår denne gang!
Camille: Bare tag det roligt.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Simone: Jeg vil gerne have klippet mine spidser.
Simone: I would like to have my ends cut.
Camille: Kun spidserne?
Camille: Only the ends?
Simone: Nej, du må gerne klippe to centimeter af.
Simone: No, you may cut two centimeters off.
Camille: Okay, så gør jeg det.
Camille: Okay, then I'll do that.
Simone: Jeg skal også have dig til at farve mit hår.
Simone: I also need you to color my hair.
Camille: Din sædvanlige farve?
Camille: Your usual color?
Simone: Nej, jeg vil gerne have, du farver det en tone lysere.
Simone: No, I would like you to color it one tone brighter.
Camille: Okay, jeg gør farven klar.
Camille: Okay, I'll get the color ready.
Simone: Og du skal ikke give mig lilla hår denne gang!
Simone: And don’t give me purple hair this time!
Camille: Bare tag det roligt.
Camille: Just take it easy.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, what are the Danish hair trends?
Anna: Danes like to keep it simple when it comes to their hair.
Eric: I see. What is a typical mens’ hairstyle?
Anna: In general, men's hair is short in the back and on the sides, but longer on the top. If it’s not too long, many give their hair a messy look with hair wax. Lately, many guys grow their hair quite long on top and either comb it to one side or straight towards the back.
Eric: And what about women?
Anna: As for women, there’s a bit more variety, but most have medium or long hair, often with layers. It’s usually either straightened or left as it is.
Eric: What are the most classic hair styles?
Anna: Two of the most classic hair styles are the ponytail and the bun. The bun can be either low or as high as literally on top of the head. Even quite a few men have grown their hair long in order to make a bun.
Eric: Interesting, I might try that myself.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: at klippe [natural native speed]
Eric: to cut
Anna: at klippe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at klippe [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at måtte [natural native speed]
Eric: may, can, must, have to, to be bound to
Anna: at måtte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at måtte [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at gøre [natural native speed]
Eric: to do, to make
Anna: at gøre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at gøre [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at skulle [natural native speed]
Eric: to have to, have got to, must, should, ought to
Anna: at skulle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at skulle [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: dig [natural native speed]
Eric: you
Anna: dig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: dig [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at farve [natural native speed]
Eric: to color, to dye
Anna: at farve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at farve [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: sædvanlig [natural native speed]
Eric: usual
Anna: sædvanlig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: sædvanlig [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: farve [natural native speed]
Eric: color
Anna: farve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: farve [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at give [natural native speed]
Eric: to give
Anna: at give [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at give [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: rolig [natural native speed]
Eric: quiet, calm, still
Anna: rolig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: rolig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: dig
Eric: which means “you.”
Anna: Dig is used when the “you” in a sentence works as the object of a verb or is preceded by a preposition.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Anna: For example, Jeg elsker dig,
Eric: “I love you.”
Anna: In this case, dig is the object of the verb at elske, which means “to love.”
Eric: Anna, I know that in Danish you have two words for “you,” right?
Anna: Yes, du and dig
Eric: How do you know which to use?
Anna: Here’s a tip. You can check whether or not you can use dig by replacing the “you” in an English sentence with a different pronoun, such as “me,” “him,” or “her.” By doing this, the overall sentence might not make much sense, but now you will know if you should be using dig in the Danish translation.
Eric: Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: sædvanlig
Eric: which means “usual.” You can use it to express that someone or something is as they are or it usually is, or as you are used to someone or something being. In other words, it can be used to express when something is “familiar” or even “well-known.”
Anna: In addition, when sædvanlig follows the conjunction som, which means “as,” you can use the phrase som sædvanlig to say “as usual.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Manden er som sædvanlig glad.
Eric: which means “As usual, the man is happy.” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: rolig
Eric: which means “quiet, calm, still.” It’s commonly used to describe someone or something that is not moving, or moving in a peaceful and regular way. For example..
Anna: havet er roligt
Eric: “The ocean is still.” You can also use it to describe the weather when there is no wind or rain, a time when you’re free from disturbances like loud noise, or a country free from acts of war.
Anna: In other words, when someone or something is calm and free of concerns or nervousness.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: For example, you can say.. Det er en rolig hund.
Eric: .. which means “It’s a calm dog.”
Anna: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to give directions and instructions using the imperative mood. Let’s begin by explaining about a modal verb used to ask someone to do something...
Anna: at skulle
Eric: which most often means “to have to,” or “must.” It’s also most commonly used as an auxiliary verb in a sentence and is followed by the main verb in the infinitive form. For example…
Anna: Du skal hente mig om en time.
Eric: “You have to pick me up in an hour.”
Anna: Jeg skal købe blomster i dag.
Eric: “I am going to buy flowers today.”
Anna: If you put together at skulle and the verb at have, meaning “to have,” you will get the phrase at skulle have.
Eric: It means “ought to have” or “to need to have” in English. But that's not everything.
Anna: You also need another verb in order to ask someone to do something for you.
Eric: Let’s take a closer look at the basic sentence construction.
Anna: Pronoun, plus skal have, plus pronoun. Then add the word til, plus the verb infinitive including at.
Eric: Okay, now for example, if you want to ask someone to vacuum the house for you, you would say…
Anna: Jeg skal have dig til at støvsuge.
Eric: This literally means something like “I need to have you to vacuum,” but it is the equivalent of “I need you to vacuum.” Let’s hear a few more examples -
Anna: Hvem skal du have til at hjælpe?
Eric: “Who do you need to help?”
Anna: Vi skal have ham til at spørge.
Eric: This means “We need him to ask.”
Anna: Bonden skal have kragerne til at forsvinde.
Eric: “The farmer needs the crows to disappear.” Alright, now let’s learn about another modal verb that is commonly used to give instructions...
Anna: at måtte
Eric: which means “may,” “can,” or “must.”
Anna: You can also use at måtte when you want to give permission.
Eric: The basic sentence structure is…
Anna: må, plus the infinitive. You can precede må with pronouns or nouns.
Eric: For example…
Anna: I må møde hende i morgen.
Eric: “You may meet her tomorrow.”
Anna: Listeners, you can also add the adverb we mentioned in another lesson, gerne,
Eric: meaning “with pleasure,” “gladly,” “willingly.” When adding it to the sentence structure above, you emphasize that you are giving permission.
Anna: In this case, må is more likely to be translated as “may,” not “can” or “must.”
Eric: For example…
Anna: Hunden må gerne komme indenfor.
Eric: This means “The dog may come inside.” This seems pretty straightforward. But how can we make the negative form to deny permission?
Anna: In that case, replace gerne with the adverb ikke, meaning “not.”
Eric: For example...
Anna: Børnene må ikke grine.
Eric: “The children may not laugh.” Alright. But Anna, how can we give orders using the imperative mood in Danish without using modal verbs?
Anna: Just like in English, you can conjugate the verb in the imperative mood, and say what you want to directly.
Eric: For example?
Anna: Drik mindre!
Eric: “Drink less!” or
Anna: Arbejd hurtigere!
Eric: “Work faster!”
Anna: You can find a chart in the Lesson Notes with more examples, both with and without modal verbs.
Eric: It will help you understand the difference.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

4 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Let's practice giving instructions for a haircut here!

Nikos
Tuesday at 11:14 PM
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From the sample sentences, I think that "Han vil gerne have dig til at starte her." should translate to "He would like you to start here.", instead of "I would like you to start here."

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:48 AM
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Hi Puri.


Thanks for your good response.


When you write "Jeg vil gerne klippe mine spidser", it's you who is going to cut the ends of your own hair. Alternatively one can write "Jeg vil gerne have klippet mine spidser" or "Jeg vil gerne have mine spidser klippet".


"Kæmme" instead of "Kam". The former is the verb "comb", whereas the latter is the noun.


Let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com


Puri
Monday at 04:40 PM
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Hej!


Jeg vil gerne klippe mine spidser, men bare spidserne!

Jeg skal ikke have dig til at tørre og kam mit hår. Tak!