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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 2 - Where in Denmark Do You Live?
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 2 - Where in Denmark Do You Live? Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the present perfect tense in Danish. The conversation takes place at a coffee shop.
Anna: It's between Nanna and Stine.
Eric: The speakers are friends. Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Nanna: Jeg har hørt, du er flyttet hjemmefra?
Stine: Ja, jeg er flyttet i lejlighed tæt på universitetsparken.
Nanna: I den nye bygning ved siden af kiosken?
Stine: Nej, på den modsatte side af parken.
Nanna: Ved parkeringspladsen?
Stine: Ja, lige præcis.
Nanna: Hvordan er du kommet ind til byen i dag?
Stine: Jeg er kommet med bussen.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Nanna: Jeg har hørt, du er flyttet hjemmefra?
Stine: Ja, jeg er flyttet i lejlighed tæt på universitetsparken.
Nanna: I den nye bygning ved siden af kiosken?
Stine: Nej, på den modsatte side af parken.
Nanna: Ved parkeringspladsen?
Stine: Ja, lige præcis.
Nanna: Hvordan er du kommet ind til byen i dag?
Stine: Jeg er kommet med bussen.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Nanna: Jeg har hørt, du er flyttet hjemmefra?
Nanna: I’ve heard you have moved away from home?
Stine: Ja, jeg er flyttet i lejlighed tæt på universitetsparken.
Stine: Yes, I’ve moved to an apartment close to the university park.
Nanna: I den nye bygning ved siden af kiosken?
Nanna: In the new building next to the kiosk?
Stine: Nej, på den modsatte side af parken.
Stine: No, on the opposite side of the park.
Nanna: Ved parkeringspladsen?
Nanna: By the parking lot?
Stine: Ja, lige præcis.
Stine: Yes, exactly.
Nanna: Hvordan er du kommet ind til byen i dag?
Nanna: How’d you get to town today?
Stine: Jeg er kommet med bussen.
Stine: I came by bus.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, when do most Danes move away from home?
Anna: Usually, it’s between the ages of 18 and 20. Most children grow up in the countryside, so once they reach adolescence they get bored and want to live closer to the cities where all the action takes place.
Eric: I see. So I guess most people move out when they begin further education at a college or university.
Anna: Right. After students turn 18, they’re eligible to receive monthly student grants from the State Education Fund to help them complete their education and get by on their own financially.
Eric: That’s a nice system to have!
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Okay, let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: at flytte [natural native speed]
Eric: to move, to remove
Anna: at flytte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at flytte [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: hjemmefra [natural native speed]
Eric: away from home
Anna: hjemmefra [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: hjemmefra [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: tæt [natural native speed]
Eric: near
Anna: tæt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: tæt [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: ved siden af [natural native speed]
Eric: next to, beside
Anna: ved siden af [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ved siden af [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: modsat [natural native speed]
Eric: opposite
Anna: modsat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
B modsat [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: park [natural native speed]
Eric: park
Anna: park [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: park [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: ved [natural native speed]
Eric: by, at
Anna: ved [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ved [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: parkeringsplads [natural native speed]
Eric: parking lot
Anna: parkeringsplads [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: parkeringsplads [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: lige præcis [natural native speed]
Eric: exactly
Anna: lige præcis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: lige præcis [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: bus [natural native speed]
Eric: bus
Anna: bus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: bus [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: at flytte
Eric: which means “to move” or “to remove.”
Anna:You use At flytte when the subject in a sentence is moving, or when the subject is moving an object.
Eric: You can also use this verb when you want something removed, or when you want something or someone that is in the way to move. For example, if you are in a hurry, it is effective to use...
Anna: at flytte
Eric: ..which is to command or to request someone to move. In the imperative mood, you use it together with the pronoun...
Anna: dig
Eric: which means “you.”
Anna: Just remember that it may come off as rude if you use Flyt dig on its own,
Eric: which means “Move!” Anna, can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Hun hjælper dem med at flytte.
Eric: ..which means “She is helping them move.” Okay, the next word is
Anna: hjemmefra
Eric: which means “away from home.”
Anna: Hjemme is an adverb that means “at home,” or “home,” and Fra can be translated as “from.”
Eric: But be aware that this word has several meanings, depending on whether it is used as a preposition, an adverb, or a conjunction.
Anna: The adverb hjemmefra is often used together with the verb at flytte, forming the phrase at flytte hjemmefra,
Eric: which literally means “to move away from home.”
Anna: In general, you can also use hjemmefra whenever you are referring to your own or someone else's home, or the neighborhood, area, or country where someone comes from or resides in.
Eric: But you don’t always necessarily have to be away from home to use this word. For example, if you’re working from home, you can say…
Anna: at arbejde hjemmefra,
Eric: which literally means “to work from home.” Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Hvornår kører du hjemmefra?
Eric: which means “When do you leave your house?”
Anna: Okay, our last phrase is lige præcis,
Eric: which means “exactly.”
Anna: The adjective lige means “straight,” or “exactly.” The adjective præcis means “exact,” or “punctual.”
Eric: You can use this phrase when you want to express that something is spot on or when you agree with someone.
Anna: Basically, you could omit lige and simply use præcis, which means “exactly.” However, by adding lige, you emphasize how exact something or someone is.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Det er lige præcis det, jeg mener.
Eric: : which means “It is exactly what I mean.”
Anna: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the present perfect tense in Danish, and how to describe surroundings using adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions.
Anna: Let’s first talk about the present perfect tense.
Eric: It’s used to express a past event or an action that has present consequences, and describes a present condition that is the result of that past event or action. The present perfect tense is formed with a present tense form of the auxiliary verbs...
Anna: at have
Eric: meaning “to have” or
Anna: at være
Eric: meaning “to be,” plus the past participle of the main verb. For example, let's take the verb…
Anna: at flytte
Eric: “to move.” The present perfect will be…
Anna: har flyttet or er flyttet. In English, both mean “have moved or has moved,” but the former is transitive and the latter is intransitive in Danish.
Eric: Alright, let’s move on to our next topic, which is describing surroundings using adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions.
Anna: Adjectives are used to describe or modify someone or something in a sentence.
Eric: In other words, they are “describing words” used to give more information about a person or a thing. Adverbs are used to modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They typically answer how, when, where, or are used to describe a frequency, degree, or level of certainty.
Anna: Note that normally, adverbs are not conjugated in Danish.
Eric: Ok, let’s give some sample sentences using adjectives.
Anna: Sure. For example, let's take the sentence Jeg har en rød bil.
Eric: This literally means “I have a red car.”
Anna: The noun bil meaning “car” is a common gender noun in the indefinite form, so the adjective stays in its dictionary form, rød.
Eric: Let’s see another example.
Anna: Sure. This time using the adjective sjov, meaning “funny.” - Det er et sjovt billede.
Eric: Meaning “It is a funny picture.”
Anna: The noun billede, meaning “picture,” is a neuter gender noun in indefinite form, and that’s why a t is added to the adjective sjov, making it sjovt.
Eric: Ok, now let’s give some sample sentences using adverbs.
Anna: Sure. Let’s use the adverb heldigvis, which means “fortunately.” You can say...Han er heldigvis overrasket,
Eric: which literally means “He is fortunately surprised,” but is the equivalent of “Fortunately, he is surprised.”
Anna: Other common adverbs that can be used to indicate directions are derfra, meaning “from there,” and herhen, meaning “ to here.”
Eric: For example…
Anna: Hvornår tager du derfra?
Eric: “When do you leave from there?”
Anna: De kommer herhen.
Eric: “They are coming here.” Okay, let’s introduce one last topic that will come in handy when describing our surroundings.
Anna: Danish prepositions!
Eric: Prepositions are words used to say something about how something is placed relative to something else. They always come before nouns or pronouns.
Anna: You can find the most commonly used Danish prepositions in the Lesson Notes.
Eric: Let’s go over a couple of examples -
Anna: Huset er lavet af træ.
Eric: This means “The house is made of wood.”
Anna: Here we have the preposition af meaning “of,”
Eric: used to indicate what something is made of. Last we have -
Anna: Hunden sidder mellem to borde.
Eric: “The dog is sitting between two tables.”
Anna: mellem is the preposition “between,” and also indicates where something is placed relative to something else.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

29 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi! Have you moved recently? Answer using the present perfect tense in the comments!

Luca P. Gentile
Saturday at 12:14 PM
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Jeg flytte fra Belgie til i Denmark.

Jeg bor her sinds en månd.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 09:12 PM
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Hi Diana,


Thank you for your feedback. We are always working on improving our materials, and your opinion is highly valuable!


To study more about verbs/ verb conjugation, please check out:

https://www.danishclass101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-21-i-see-danish-snacks-in-your-future/

https://www.danishclass101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-22-talking-about-your-habits-in-danish/?lp=26

https://www.danishclass101.com/lesson/beginner-5-the-danish-weather-is-predictably-unpredictable/?lp=18

https://www.danishclass101.com/lesson/beginner-6-what-are-your-plans-for-the-danish-future/?lp=18

https://www.danishclass101.com/lesson/intermediate-4-running-into-an-old-friend-in-denmark/?lp=24


Hope it helps! Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team DanishClass101.com

Diana Chung
Wednesday at 09:27 AM
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Why is the second beginner's lesson present perfect!?! Is the assumption that I should have learned present and past tenses elsewhere? There's no explanation on how to conjugate the past participle. Also, it would be nice if gendered and neutered were explained somewhere. I've studied 5 other languages, 3 of them non-European, and NONE of them assumed present perfect was a 'beginner" lesson.

DanishClass101.com
Sunday at 11:24 PM
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Hi Barros,


Thank you for leaving the comment!


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team DanishClass101.com


Barros
Tuesday at 10:22 AM
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Hej


Jeg har flyttet til Danmark to år siden.

Jeg bor ved siden af to park i København.


tak.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:43 AM
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Hi Marta.


Thanks for your response.


Well done. Almost everything is correct in your sentence.


One could add an "et" in front of "supermarked".


"jeg har købt et bord..." like in "Jeg har flyttet...". "Bord" is neuter and not common gender.


Keep up the good work.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com



Marta
Sunday at 11:49 PM
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Hej, jeg er Marta og jeg er flyttet i en lille lejlighed tæt på supermarked og fitness center i April sidste år. Jeg har flyttet min seng og min sofa med mig, og jeg er købt en ny bord og nye stole.

DanishClass101.com
Wednesday at 01:28 AM
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...If the cat was going into the forest, it would be "Katten går ind i skoven". If the cat is walking in the forest, it would be "Katten går inde i skoven".


I hope that answers your question. Otherwise, don't hesitate to ask again.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

DanishClass101.com
Wednesday at 01:28 AM
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Hi Sarah.


Thanks for your question.


Your Danish seems really good. However, there are a few things I'd like to mention.


It's called "i Roskilde Fjord" and "et spørgsmål til dig". Prepositions can often be hard to handle.


To answer your question, "inde" in many cases means "inside". The words don't always work the same way, though. You can say: "Katten er inde i skoven", which is only slightly different from "Katten er i skoven". "Inde" is not necessary in that sentence, but gives it another flavor. "Katten er inde skoven" is nonsense, since "inde" in most cases needs to be followed by "i".

On the other hand, one can't really say "The cat is inside the forest"...

DanishClass101.com
Wednesday at 12:56 AM
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Hi Monique.


Thanks for posting.


That's almost correct. In order to use the present perfect tense, this is how it should be:


"Jeg hedder Monique og (jeg) er flyttet til København for omkring et år siden" (instead of "Jeg hedder Monique og jeg flyttede til København sidste år" in present tense).


In the other sentence, the end could be sharpened a bit:


"...ved siden af apoteket" or "...ved siden af et apotek".


Well done!


Have a nice evening.


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com