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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 23 - Gosh, Did You Get a New Tattoo in Denmark?
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 23 - Gosh, Did You Get a New Tattoo in Denmark? Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson you’ll learn how to speak naturally using interjections. The conversation takes place at the beach.
Anna: It's between Camille and Marcus.
Eric: The speakers are friends. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Camille: Nøj, har du fået en ny tatovering?!
Markus: Ja, det har jeg.
Camille: Ej, hvor er den flot! Gjorde det ondt?
Markus: Arh, kun på nogle tidspunkter.
Camille: Nårh...
Markus: Men det var det værd.
Camille: Uh, har du set min?
Markus: Næh. Jeg vidste ikke, du havde en.
Camille: Ih altså! Så se her!
Markus: Åh nej, du har også en tiger!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Camille: Nøj, har du fået en ny tatovering?!
Markus: Ja, det har jeg.
Camille: Ej, hvor er den flot! Gjorde det ondt?
Markus: Arh, kun på nogle tidspunkter.
Camille: Nårh...
Markus: Men det var det værd.
Camille: Uh, har du set min?
Markus: Næh. Jeg vidste ikke, du havde en.
Camille: Ih altså! Så se her!
Markus: Åh nej, du har også en tiger!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Camille: Nøj, har du fået en ny tatovering?!
Camille: No, you've got a new tattoo?!
Markus: Ja, det har jeg.
Marcus: Yes, I have.
Camille: Ej, hvor er den flot! Gjorde det ondt?
Camille: No way, it looks so good! Did it hurt?
Markus: Arh, kun på nogle tidspunkter.
Marcus: Well, only sometimes.
Camille: Nårh...
Camille: Aw…
Markus: Men det var det værd.
Marcus: But it was worth it.
Camille: Uh, har du set min?
Camille: Oh, have you seen mine?
Markus: Næh. Jeg vidste ikke, du havde en.
Marcus: Nah. I didn’t know you had one.
Camille: Ih altså! Så se her!
Camille: Gosh! Then look here!
Markus: Åh nej, du har også en tiger!
Marcus: Oh no, you also have a tiger!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, are airbrush tattoos popular in Denmark?
Anna: I think so. You can often find airbrush tattoo artists at outdoor events like festivals so people under 18 can try “getting a tattoo.”
Eric: I know that airbrush tattoos usually last for a couple of weeks if you’re careful with water and don’t rub them.
Anna: Right. And permanent tattoos have also become more popular over the past few years, so you’ll see many young people with full sleeves, or at least one tattoo somewhere.
Eric: One reason for this trend might be that in Denmark it’s become acceptable to have visible tattoos, even at many workplaces.
Anna: Right. That also goes for piercings.
Eric: That’s interesting! Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: nøj [natural native speed]
Eric: no, gee
Anna: nøj [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nøj [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: ej [natural native speed]
Eric: no
Anna: ej [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ej [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: arh [natural native speed]
Eric: ah
Anna: arh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: arh [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: nårh [natural native speed]
Eric: aw
Anna: nårh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nårh [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: værd [natural native speed]
Eric: worth
Anna: værd [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: værd [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: uh [natural native speed]
Eric: oh
Anna: uh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: uh [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: ih [natural native speed]
Eric: gosh, gee
Anna: ih [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ih [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: altså [natural native speed]
Eric: accordingly, in other words, really
Anna: altså [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: altså [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: åh [natural native speed]
Eric: oh
Anna: åh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: åh [natural native speed]
Eric:And last..
Anna: nej [natural native speed]
Eric: no
Anna: nej [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nej [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is the interjection...
Anna: arh
Eric: which means “ah.” You can use it to express reservation, slight disagreement, doubt, or other similar feelings.
Anna: Right. You can use arh, for example, when someone asks you about something and you hesitate to give them an answer because you’re not sure, or you know you can’t give them the answer they want.
Eric: Anna, can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: For example, you can say.. Kan du lide maden? Arh... Det smager okay.
Eric: ..which means “Do you like the food?” “Ah... It tastes okay.” What's the next word?
Anna: the interjection nårh
Eric: which means “aw.”You can use it to express pity towards someone or something. It can also be used when you see someone or something cute.
Anna: Listeners, be aware that some Danes can be really sarcastic at times. So saying nårh is another popular way of pretending to pity someone when you don’t really pity them at all.
Eric: If you whine too much about small problems, you’re very likely to be met with the interjection “aw” and a frowning face imitating you whining.
Anna: But of course, this is only done among people who know each other well.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Nårh, sikke en sød hundehvalp!
Eric: .. which means “Aw, what a cute puppy!” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: altså
Eric: which means “accordingly, in other words, or really.”
Anna: The adverb altså is made of the adverbs alt and så. Alt means “all” and så means “so.”
Eric: You can use this word to express irritation, blame, commitment, or some other emotion.
Anna: Right. For example, Nej, altså!
Eric: This literally means “No, really,” but is the equivalent of an emphatic “No!” Anna, what’s another example using this word?
Anna: You can say.. Altså, hør nu efter!
Eric: .. which means “No, pay attention!” or “So pay attention!” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson you’ll learn how to speak naturally using Danish interjections. Our first interjection is…
Anna: Nøj... the interjection equivalent to the English expressions “no way” or “gee.”
Eric: You can use it when you want to express enthusiasm, excitement, or wonder.
Anna: Right. We never use it to say a negative “no.” Nøj is always placed at the very beginning of a sentence and is usually followed by the adverb hvor, which usually means “where,” but in this case it means “how.”
Eric: So when you want to express enthusiasm or excitement, you can use the following sentence phrase...
Anna: Nøj, hvor…!
Eric: which means “Gee, how…!” Let’s take a closer look at some examples.
Anna: Nøj, hvor er jeg glad!
Eric: This literally means “Gee, how am I happy!” but you can translate it as “Gee, I'm so happy!”
Anna: Nøj, hvor sang de godt!
Eric: “Gee, how well they sang!” Okay. Our next interjection is…
Anna: uh
Eric: You can use it to express all kinds of feelings.
Anna: But we use uh most often to express excitement, discomfort, or fear.
Eric: You can use the following phrase to express your feelings…
Anna: Uh, hvor…!
Eric: “Oh, how…!”. Let’s take a look at some examples.
Anna: Uh, hvor er her mørkt!
Eric: This literally means “Oh, how is here dark!” but you can translate it as “Oh, how dark it is here!” or “Oh, it is so dark here!” Let’s have one more example.
Anna: Uh, hvor så det vildt ud!
Eric: which means “Oh, how crazy that looked” or just “Oh, that looked crazy!” And our last interjection for this lesson is…
Anna: ih
Eric: ...which can be translated as “gosh” or “gee.” It’s another interjection used to express different feelings like enthusiasm, excitement, hope, surprise, or even irritation.
Anna: So when you want to express how you feel by using ih, you can say…Ih, hvor…!
Eric: which means “Gosh or Gee, how…!”. Here are some sample sentences.
Anna: Ih, hvor råber I højt!
Eric: “Gosh, how loud you are shouting!” or “Gosh, you’re shouting so loud!”
Anna: Ih, hvor bliver hun stor!
Eric: “Gee, how big she is becoming!” or “Gee, she’s getting so big!”
Anna: Listeners, there’s actually one more way of using the interjection ih.
Eric: You can use it to emphasize a “yes” or “no” answer. For example, if someone asks...
Anna: Vil du have mere?
Eric: which means “Do you want more?”, you can reply by saying…
Anna: Ih ja.
Eric: meaning “Oh yes.”
Anna: In this case, ih is the equivalent of “oh” in English.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Anna: Hej hej!

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Friday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Is there a Danish interjection that you like to use often?