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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 9 - The Secret Lives of Others in Denmark
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 9 - The Secret Lives of Others in Denmark. Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to accept or reject an invitation in Danish. The conversation takes place in a public park.
Anna: It's between Camille and Marcus.
Eric: The speakers are acquaintances. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Camille: Har du nogle planer på lørdag?
Markus: Hmm, det mener jeg ikke.
Camille: Har du lyst til at komme til fest hos mig om aftenen?
Markus: Åh, jeg ville gerne, men jeg kan desværre ikke.
Camille: Hvorfor ikke?
Markus: Jeg er kommet i tanke om, at jeg allerede har en aftale lørdag aften.
Camille: Sig ikke du får dine forældre på besøg!
Markus: Nej, jeg skal på date.
Camille: Med hvem?!
Markus: Din søster.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Camille: Har du nogle planer på lørdag?
Markus: Hmm, det mener jeg ikke.
Camille: Har du lyst til at komme til fest hos mig om aftenen?
Markus: Åh, jeg ville gerne, men jeg kan desværre ikke.
Camille: Hvorfor ikke?
Markus: Jeg er kommet i tanke om, at jeg allerede har en aftale lørdag aften.
Camille: Sig ikke du får dine forældre på besøg!
Markus: Nej, jeg skal på date.
Camille: Med hvem?!
Markus: Din søster.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Camille: Har du nogle planer på lørdag?
Camille: Do you have any plans on Saturday?
Markus: Hmm, det mener jeg ikke.
Marcus: Hmm, I don't think so.
Camille: Har du lyst til at komme til fest hos mig om aftenen?
Camille: Do you feel like coming to a party at my place in the evening?
Markus: Åh, jeg ville gerne, men jeg kan desværre ikke.
Marcus: Oh, I’d like to, but unfortunately I can't.
Camille: Hvorfor ikke?
Camille: Why not?
Markus: Jeg er kommet i tanke om, at jeg allerede har en aftale lørdag aften.
Marcus: I have remembered that I already have plans on Saturday evening.
Camille: Sig ikke du får dine forældre på besøg!
Camille: Don't tell me that you are getting a visit from your parents!
Markus: Nej, jeg skal på date.
Marcus: No, I’m going on a date.
Camille: Med hvem?!
Camille: With who?!
Markus: Din søster.
Marcus: Your sister.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, how do Danes invite each other to events?
Anna: It really depends on the person. Some might invite you to a party without actually asking if you want to come. They simply let you know the details of what, when, and where. If they really want to persuade you to come, they'll also likely mention who else will be there.
Eric: And what about written invitations?
Anna: Written invitations in Danish can be creative and are sometimes quite formal. You might see Det vil glæde mig at se dig written in an invitation, which means “I would be pleased to see you.”
Eric: Is there anything else we should know when it comes to invitations?
Anna: Don't worry too much if you overhear colleagues or classmates talking about going to a party that you haven't been invited to. Such situations can lead to feeling awkward or left out, but it may be that they think you're not interested and therefore haven’t bothered to invite you.
Eric: Or it may be the case that they brought it up openly because it’s a party where everyone is welcome.
Anna: That’s true, so if you really want to go then just ask if you can come along, too.
Eric: That’s a good cultural tip!
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: plan [natural native speed]
Eric: plan, schedule
Anna: plan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: plan [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: lyst [natural native speed]
Eric: desire, urge
Anna: lyst [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: lyst [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: gerne [natural native speed]
Eric: with pleasure, gladly, willingly, usually
Anna: gerne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: gerne [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: desværre [natural native speed]
Eric: unfortunately
Anna: desværre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: desværre [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: hvorfor [natural native speed]
Eric: why
Anna: hvorfor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: hvorfor [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at komme i tanke om [natural native speed]
Eric: to remember, to come to mind
Anna: at komme i tanke om [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at komme i tanke om [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: allerede [natural native speed]
Eric: already
Anna: allerede [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: allerede [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: aftale [natural native speed]
Eric: agreement, arrangement, deal, appointment, date
Anna: aftale [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: aftale [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: besøg [natural native speed]
Eric: visit
Anna: besøg [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: besøg [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: søster [natural native speed]
Eric: sister
Anna: søster [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: søster [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: desværre
Eric: which means “unfortunately.”
Anna: You can use desværre to express regret.
Eric: For example, you can say…
Anna: desværre ikke
Eric: meaning “unfortunately not.” Can you give us another example?
Anna: Sure. Du har desværre ikke vundet.
Eric: meaning “Unfortunately, you have not won.” Okay, what's the next phrase?
Anna: hvorfor ikke
Eric: which means “why not.”
Anna: The adverb hvorfor means “why” and ikke means “not” or “no.”
Eric: You can use this phrase to simply ask “why not?” It can also be used to make suggestions. For example...
Anna: Hvorfor ikke blive hjemme?
Eric: literally meaning “Why not stay at home?"
Anna: You can add a verb and a pronoun between hvorfor and ikke to specify your question. For example, Hvorfor går du ikke?
Eric: meaning “Why aren't you leaving?” or “Why don't you leave?” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: aftale
Eric: which means “agreement,” “appointment,” or “date.”
Anna: Aftale usually goes with the verb at have,
Eric: which means “to have.”
Anna: So, like in English, at have en aftale literally means
Eric: ...“to have an agreement” or “to have an appointment.”
Anna: Right. Receptionists will often ask you the question Har du en aftale?
Eric: meaning “Do you have an appointment?”
Anna: Many people also use the noun tid, meaning “time,” to refer to an appointment.
Eric: Which is used in reference to a doctor's or dentist's appointment.
Anna: In those cases, Tid is more commonly used than aftale.
Eric: For example,
Anna: at have en tid hos lægen
Eric: literally means “to have a time with the doctor,” but it’s the equivalent of “to have a doctor's appointment.” Can you give us one last example using this word?
Anna: Sure. De har allerede lavet en aftale.
Eric: “They have already made a deal.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to accept or reject an invitation in Danish using the phrase...
Anna: at have lyst
Eric: “to feel like.”
Anna: This phrasal verb consists of the verb at have meaning “to have,” and the common gender noun lyst, meaning “desire” or ”urge.”
Eric: You can use it to express a temporary need or desire to act a certain way or to get something in particular, often with the end goal of being entertained or satisfied.
Anna: You can use this phrase in both affirmative and negative forms. Jeg har lyst til…
Eric: “I feel like…”
Anna: Jeg har ikke lyst til…
Eric: “I don't feel like…”
Anna: As you can see, we have just added the adverb ikke meaning “not” to form the negative version.
Eric: Here we have our first example.
Anna: Jeg har lyst til at spise.
Eric: “I feel like eating.”
Anna: When expressing the need to act in a certain way, you simply need to add the verb in infinitive form, along with the marker at. In the example, we have at spise.
Eric: Meaning “to eat.” Let’s see another example, this time with a noun.
Anna: Jeg har lyst til chokolade.
Eric: This means “I feel like chocolate.” Here, the phrasal verb is used to express the need to get something in particular, which in this case is chocolate.
Anna: You can replace the noun chokolade with any other noun in any other form.
Eric: For example -
Anna: Jeg har lyst til et glas vand.
Eric: “I feel like a glass of water.”
Anna: Et glas vand means “a glass of water.”
Eric: Now, let’s look at a sample sentence that uses
Anna: lyst til
Eric: to accept or reject an invitation.
Anna: Ja, selvfølgelig har jeg lyst til at komme til festen.
Eric: “Yes, of course I feel like coming to the party.”
Anna: Nej, jeg har ikke lyst til at komme til festen.
Eric: “No, I don’t feel like coming to the party.”
Anna: You can replace til festen with any other event.
Eric: And you can leave it out if it’s obvious what the invitation is about. Okay, our second grammar point is the usage of the adverb
Anna: desværre
Eric: meaning “unfortunately.” It is often used to express regret, but it can also be used in formal courtesy expressions to turn something or someone down, or to communicate something else that's unpleasant. For example…
Anna: Desværre, jeg kan ikke komme.
Eric: “Unfortunately, I cannot come.” You can also say -
Anna: Jeg kan desværre ikke komme.
Eric: “I cannot come, unfortunately.”
Anna: The two sentences are basically the same, but the former sounds slightly more regretful, because desværre comes at the beginning of the sentence.
Eric: You can also use this word to indicate that something is unfortunate. In this case, it is used as the equivalent of “sadly.” Here’s an example -
Anna: Desværre for mig har jeg ikke tid til at komme.
Eric: This literally means “Sadly for me, I do not have time to come.”
Anna: Listeners, desværre will come in handy when you need to reject an invitation, since you can really emphasize how sorry you are about missing the event.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

3 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi! Let's practice declining an invitation here!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:34 PM
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Hi Elena.


Thanks for posting.


Yes, it does sound a bit weird, specially if you misinterpret it as "I feel like a pizza tonight".


The Danish "lyst til" is quite common and is best translated with "feel like". "Lust for" is too strong, although the word is closer.


"I want/would like a pizza tonight" would be "Jeg vil have en pizza i aften" or "Jeg kunne godt tænke mig en pizza i aften". They would also work, and the meaning is similar. The former sounds a bit dramatic as if it's followed by "And there's nothing that can stop me".


Let us know if you have any further questions.


Keep up the good work.


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Elena
Monday at 09:35 PM
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Jeg har lyst til pizza i aften.

"I feel like pizza tonight."


This really seems confusing and weird 😳

I think that I would translate it as: "I want a pizza tonight."


I would like to hear your opinion about this.