Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com! This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 14 - Has Your Danish Friend Changed for the Better? John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to construct the continuous and progressive aspects. The conversation takes place at an apartment.
Nana: It's between Emily and Sophia.
John: The speakers are friends. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Emilie: Jeg sad og drak kaffe med min eks i lørdags, og vi blev enige om at prøve igen.
Sofia: Gjorde I? Jeg stod lige og tænkte på, hvad der var blevet af ham.
Emilie: Der er sket meget. Han ligger ikke længere og feder den på sofaen.
Sofia: Er det rigtigt?! Det skal jeg høre mere om!
Emilie: Han havde åbenbart siddet og lavet en liste over ting, han ville ændre i sit liv.
Sofia: Det lyder da fornuftigt. Hvilke forandringer har han så lavet?
Emilie: For det første går han på uni, og for nyligt blev han tjener på en café.
Sofia: Jeg troede virkelig, han bare gik og lavede ingenting. Han er blevet et nyt menneske.
Emilie: Det kan man roligt sige. Jeg blev også meget overrasket.
Sofia: Men hvad med dig? Hvordan har du det med at være tilbage igen?
Emilie: Fint! Det var sjovt at rejse, men jeg er glad for ikke at bo i en rygsæk længere.
Sofia: Jeg har tit siddet og kigget på de billeder, du har delt. Blev det aldrig hårdt at være væk?
Emilie: Jo, det blev hårdt, da monsunsæsonen startede!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Emily: I sat drinking coffee with my ex last Saturday, and we agreed on trying again.
Sophia: You did? I was just thinking about what had become of him.
Emily: A lot has happened. He no longer lies on the couch lazing around.
Sophia: Really?! I must hear more about that!
Emily: Apparently, he sat and made a list of things he wanted to change in his life.
Sophia: That sounds sensible. What changes has he made then?
Emily: First of all, he goes to uni, and recently he became a waiter at a café.
Sophia: I really thought he was just walking around doing nothing. He has become a new person.
Emily: That is safe to say. I was also very surprised.
Sophia: But what about you? How do you feel about being back again?
Emily: Fine! It was fun to travel, but I’m glad not to live in a backpack anymore.
Sophia: I have often sat and looked at the pictures you’ve shared. Did it ever get hard to be away?
Emily: Yes, it got hard when the monsoon season started!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: So Emily is giving her ex another chance.
Nana: It sounds like he’s changed quite a lot, so hopefully it’ll work out this time.
John: I hope so! It’s good that even though she’s in a relationship again, she’s still hanging out with her friends.
Nana: Danes do that. If you’re in a relationship, it’s normal to still hang out with your friends and pursue your hobbies.
John: That’s good. Some time apart is good in relationships, I think.
Nana: I think so too. Every relationship is different, of course.
John: Of course! But you need to have mutual respect and good communication in any relationship.
Nana: Yeah, if there’s a problem you should acknowledge it and face it. It’s becoming more acceptable to do that, even if it ends the relationship.
John: It’s probably for the best if it does.
Nana: There is one thing that isn’t acceptable though - utroskab.
John: What does that mean?
Nana: It means “infidelity” or “cheating.”
John: Yeah, that’s never good! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: eks [natural native speed]
John: ex
Nana: eks [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: eks [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: lørdag [natural native speed]
John: Saturday
Nana: lørdag [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lørdag [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: være enig [natural native speed]
John: to agree
Nana: være enig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: være enig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: blive af [natural native speed]
John: to become of
Nana: blive af [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: blive af [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ikke længere [natural native speed]
John: no longer, not anymore
Nana: ikke længere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ikke længere [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: fede den [natural native speed]
John: to laze
Nana: fede den [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fede den [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ændre [natural native speed]
John: to change, to alter
Nana: ændre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ændre [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: forandring [natural native speed]
John: change
Nana: forandring [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: forandring [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: første [natural native speed]
John: first
Nana: første [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: første [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: rygsæk [natural native speed]
John: backpack
Nana: rygsæk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: rygsæk [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: i lørdags
John: meaning "last Saturday." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This is a fixed phrase.
John: Oh? So the individual words mean different things?
Nana: The preposition i usually means "in," but in this case it means "last." Lørdag means "Saturday," but when used in this expression, an -s is added at the end.
John: Can you use it with other days of the week?
Nana: Yes, just don’t forget the -s at the end!
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Hvad skete der til festen i lørdags?
John: ...which means "What happened at the party last Saturday?"
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: for det første
John: Meaning "first of all." Can you break this expression down for us, Nana?
Nana: Sure. First is the preposition for, which means "for," the definite article det, which means "the," and finally the adjective første, which means "first."
John: Other similar phrases in English are "to begin with," or "for one thing."
Nana: And like in English, you use it at the start of a sentence.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, For det første var det ham, som spurgte. For det andet...
John: ...which means "First of all, it was he who asked. Second of all..."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: bo i en rygsæk
John: Meaning "to live in a backpack." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: This is actually an idiom.
John: Can you break it down for us?
Nana: It has the regular verb bo, which means "to reside," the preposition i, which means "in," the indefinite article en, which means "a," and finally the common gender noun rygsæk, which means "backpack."
John: It’s used when someone travels from place to place and doesn’t have a permanent home.
Nana: The use of rygsæk is metaphorical.
John: Right. It doesn’t necessarily mean they’re using a backpack. Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Han kan bo i en rygsæk i flere år.
John: ...which literally means "He can live in a backpack for several years."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to construct the continuous and progressive aspects.
John: First, what are the continuous and progressive aspects in present tense for?
Nana: They’re used when what you’re doing in the present will continue for some time.
John: And how do we construct these aspects?
Nana: You put one of five verbs in front of another verb. The magic five verbs are sidde, stå, ligge, gå, and løbe.
John: These mean “to sit,” “to stand,” “to lie,” “to walk,” and “to run.”
Nana: These are conjugated in present tense by adding an -r to the end of the verb in infinitive form. You do the same with the second verb, and put og, meaning “and,” in the middle.
John: Can we have an example?
Nana: Kvinderne står og sladrer på gaden.
John: “The women stand gossiping in the street.” How about constructing the continuous and progressive aspects in past tense?
Nana: You use this for actions that happened in the past that continued for some time. Again, we use the same five verbs and they are conjugated into past tense.
John: Are those five verbs regular verbs?
Nana: Unfortunately not! And you still need og between one of the five verbs and the second verb.
John: Again, can we have an example?
Nana: Parret gik og holdt hinanden i hånden.
John: “The couple walked holding each other’s hands.” As we’re dealing with irregular verbs, let’s have one more example.
Nana: Vi løb rundt og ledte efter hukommelseskortet i hele huset.
John: “We ran around looking for the memory card throughout the house.” Finally, let’s look at the present perfect and past perfect tense.
Nana: You use these verbs in present perfect tense when what you were doing in the past continued for some time, but has now finished, or extended to the present.
John: The past perfect tense is for when what you were doing in the past continued for some time, but finished before something else happened.
Nana: For both, we need to conjugate the auxiliary verb have, which means “to have,” in present or past tense.
John: Then we add the past participle of the five verbs. The second verb should also be in its past participle form.
Nana: And the same word goes in the middle.
John: So, let’s hear a couple of examples.
Nana: Hendes venner har stået og holdt øje med hende.
John: “Her friends have stood watching her.”
Nana: Drengen havde gået og spekuleret over tingene.
John: “The boy had walked around wondering about things.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

2 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Let's practice in the comments!

Roger
Saturday at 02:41 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I går sad jeg i haven og læste.

I dag sidder jeg i haven og læser.

I morgen sidder jeg i haven og læser.

I morges har jeg siddet i haven og læst.