Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 18 - Making an Appointment with a Danish Dentist. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to discuss ability and skill. The conversation takes place over the phone.
Nana: Kim is calling for an appointment.
John: Okay, let's listen to Kim’s speech.
DIALOGUE
Kim: Goddag. Du taler med Kim Juul. Jeg vil gerne bestille en tid snarest muligt.
Kim: Mit personnummer er 130683-3095.
Kim: Der er sket det, at jeg er begyndt at skære tænder i søvne. Ja, det er ikke så godt.
Kim: Først på fredag siger du? Kan du ikke finde en ledig tid før? Jeg er ikke i stand til at komme fredag.
Kim: Det er ligegyldigt, hvornår på dagen det er. Bare jeg kan komme til lidt før.
Kim: Nej, det gør ikke ondt, men min kæreste synes, det er lidt forstyrrende. Hun kan tydeligt høre det.
Kim: Var du i stand til at finde en ledig tid torsdag over middag? Fantastisk! Den tager jeg.
Kim: Klokken 12.15? Det skriver jeg lige ind i min kalender.
Kim: Ja, det skal nok gå. Hun må bare sove med ørepropper.
Kim: Ja, vi ses på torsdag. Tak for hjælpen.
Kim: Tak i lige måde. Farvel.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Kim: Hello. You're speaking to Kim Juul. I would like to make an appointment as soon as possible.
Kim: My civil registration number is 130683-3095
Kim: What has happened is that I've started grinding my teeth in my sleep. Yes, that's not very good.
Kim: Not until Friday, you say? Can't you find an available time sooner? I can’t come Friday.
Kim: It doesn't matter what time of the day it is. As long as I can come in a little sooner.
Kim: No, it doesn't hurt, but my girlfriend thinks it’s a little disturbing. She can clearly hear it.
Kim: Were you able to find an available time Thursday afternoon? Great! I'll take it.
Kim: At 12:15? I'll just write that into my calendar.
Kim: Yes, it'll be alright. She'll just have to sleep with earplugs.
Kim: Yes, see you on Thursday. Thank you for your help.
Kim: Thanks, you too. Goodbye.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: A dentist’s appointment. I think that ranks quite highly on the list of things people hate the most.
Nana: Yeah, it does, but sometimes you have to go.
John: That’s true. What’s dental care like in Denmark?
Nana: If you’re under 18, it’s free.
John: That’s good for children, but what if you’re over 18?
Nana: Then you have to pay for appointments and treatment yourself.
John: Is it expensive?
Nana: It ranges from a couple hundred to a couple thousand kroner, depending on the treatment.
John: Are there any kind of subsidies from the authorities?
Nana: For some treatments, there can be, yes. One of the most common dental issues is huller i tænderne.
John: What does that mean?
Nana: “Cavities.” Also, people often get braces before their Confirmation, which is sort of a coming of age ceremony.
John: So you want to look good for that! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: goddag [natural native speed]
John: hello, good day, how do you do
Nana: goddag [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: goddag [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tid [natural native speed]
John: time, appointment, tense
Nana: tid [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tid [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: mulig [natural native speed]
John: possible
Nana: mulig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: mulig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: personnummer [natural native speed]
John: civil registration number
Nana: personnummer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: personnummer [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: skære [natural native speed]
John: to cut, to grind
Nana: skære [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: skære [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: søvn [natural native speed]
John: sleep
Nana: søvn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: søvn [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ledig [natural native speed]
John: available, free, vacant, unemployed, idle
Nana: ledig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ledig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: komme [natural native speed]
John: to come
Nana: komme [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: komme [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: forstyrrende [natural native speed]
John: disturbing, distracting
Nana: forstyrrende [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: forstyrrende [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: øreprop [natural native speed]
John: earplug
Nana: øreprop [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: øreprop [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Nana: snarest muligt
John: meaning "as soon as possible." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This phrase consists of the adverb snart in superlative form, meaning "soon," and the adjective muligt means "possible."
John: And it means “as soon as possible.”
Nana: Sometimes snarest is exchanged for the adjective hurtig, which means "quick" or "fast."
John: How do we say this other phrase?
Nana: Hurtigst muligt
John: “as quickly as possible.” Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Giv os besked snarest muligt.
John: ...which means "Notify us as soon as possible."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: skære tænder
John: Meaning "to grind one's teeth." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: First is the irregular verb skære,
John: which means "cut" or "carve,"
Nana: and then the common gender noun tand in plural form,
John: meaning "teeth." It literally means “to cut teeth,” but the less morbid version is “to grind one’s teeth.”
Nana: Yes. The phrase is always in plural form, as you don’t grind just one tooth!
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Hendes mor skar ofte tænder.
John: ...which means "Her mother often grinded her teeth."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: i søvne
John: Meaning "in one's sleep." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This is a fixed phrase.
John: Can you break it down for us?
Nana: It consists of the preposition i,
John: which means "in,"
Nana: and the common gender noun søvn, which means "sleep."
John: You can use this with actions performed while sleeping.
Nana: Yes, for example, gå i søvne means "to sleepwalk."
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Du snakkede meget i søvne i nat.
John: ...which means "You talked a lot in your sleep last night." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to discuss ability and skill.
John: In English, we often use modal verbs to discuss ability, such as “can.”
Nana: In Danish we also use a modal verb - the irregular verb kunne. Just conjugate kunne according to the tense. Then add a verb in infinitive form describing the ability or skill you are talking about.
John: Seems simple enough! Can you just quickly recap how to make the present perfect tense for us, so we can use it with this modal verb too?
Nana: Sure. Use the irregular verb have conjugated in present tense, followed by the past participle of kunne and then the verb describing a given ability or skill in infinitive form.
John: Thank you! Let’s go through the conjugations for this modal verb. First, in present tense, it’s...
Nana: kan.
John: In past tense, it’s
Nana: kunne.
John: And in present perfect tense, we use
Nana: har kunnet.
John: Now how about some example sentences?
Nana: Han kan huske tandlægens nummer.
John: “He can remember the dentist’s number.”
Nana: Tandlægen har altid kunnet ordne problemerne.
John: “The dentist has always been able to fix the problems.” Are there other ways to describe skill?
Nana: Yes, you can use the phrase være i stand til.
John: This means something similar to “to be able to” or “to be capable of.” Can you break it down for us?
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb være which means “to be.” The second word is the preposition i which has several meanings, such as “in.”
John: And what are the third and fourth words?
Nana: The third word is the common gender noun stand which means “condition.” And finally, the word til is a preposition, with several meanings, such as “to” or “of.”
John: How do you use this in a sentence?
Nana: You follow the phrase with the infinitive marker at,
John: which means “to.”
Nana: And then a verb in infinitive form, corresponding to a given skill or quality.
John: Don’t forget to conjugate the first verb!
Nana: Of course! You must conjugate være according to the tense.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Nana: En tandlæge er i stand til at identificere dårlige vaner.
John: “A dentist is capable of identifying bad habits.”
Nana: Jeg har været i stand til at spise hård mad, men ikke længere.
John: “I was able to eat hard food, but not anymore.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

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Monday at 06:30 PM
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What are some of the abilities you are most proud of? Tell us in Danish

Roger
Wednesday at 02:50 PM
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Jeg er i stand til lidt dansk.

Jeg er i stand til fransk.

Jeg var i stand til tysk.

Jeg har været i stand til russisk.