Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 19 - An Unusual Reason to Visit the Danish Dentist. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to explain what happened at the dentist's. The conversation takes place at the dentist's office.
Nana: It's between Carsten, Kim, and Theresa.
John: The main speakers are strangers. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Carsten: Undskyld, vi har brug for noget hjælp her! Gør plads!
Kim: Åh, hvad er der sket?! Skynd dig at sætte dig ned her.
Carsten: Ja, jeg er ked af, at vi er nødt til at snyde foran i køen, men det er et nødstilfælde.
Kim: Måske er det bedst, hvis hun ligger ned?
Carsten: Jeg tror godt, hun kan sidde oprejst. Min overraskelse kom til at nedlægge min kone.
Kim: Jeg er ikke med. Skal jeg ikke finde en tandlæge? Den ene tager røntgen, den anden borer vist huller.
Carsten: Vi opgav at komme igennem på telefonen. Min kone har fået flækket sin tand af en hund.
Kim: En hund? Hvordan kunne det ske? Så det var hunden, der var overraskelsen?
Carsten: Vi ved ikke, hvordan det egentlig skete. Den ville nok gerne kysse hende. Læg dig, Buster!
Theresa: Jeg håber, at nerven kan reddes med en rodbehandling og en krone.
Kim: Det blev pludselig dyrere end forventet at få hund. Så! Nu stoppede boret derinde.
Carsten: Vi er kede af, vi stjæler din plads. Hvad skal du have ordnet?
Kim: Jeg skærer såmænd bare tænder i søvne.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Carsten: Excuse me, we need some help here! Make way!
Kim: Oh, what happened?! Hurry up and sit down here.
Carsten: Yes, I'm sorry we have to cut in front of the line, but it’s an emergency.
Kim: Maybe it's best if she lies down?
Carsten: I think she can sit upright. My surprise accidentally brought down my wife.
Kim: I'm not following. Why don't I find a dentist? One is taking an X-ray, the other might be drilling cavities.
Carsten: We gave up on getting through by phone. My wife has had her tooth cracked by a dog.
Kim: A dog? How could that happen? So it was the dog that was the surprise?
Carsten: We don't know how it actually happened. It probably wanted to kiss her. Lay down, Buster!
Theresa: I hope that the nerve can be saved with a root canal treatment and a crown.
Kim: It suddenly got more expensive than expected to get a dog. Oh! Now the drill stopped in there.
Carsten: We're sorry we're stealing your place. What are you having fixed?
Kim: Actually, I just grind my teeth in my sleep.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Well, that’s an interesting reason for a visit to the dentist’s!
Nana: Yeah, an overly enthusiastic dog attack.
John: I bet the dentist hasn’t seen many of those. I wonder what type of dog it was?
Nana: I can tell you what kind of dog it wasn’t.
John: Really?
Nana: Yes, because the Danish Act on Dogs bans 13 breeds, so it definitely wouldn’t be any of those.
John: What kind of dogs are banned?
Nana: Certain breeds of terriers, mastiffs, shepherds, and sheepdogs, amongst others. Even if a dog is only part one of these breeds, it’s banned.
John: So be careful if you want to take a dog to Denmark. What are popular names for dogs? Is Buster popular?
Nana: Yes, so are Molly, Bella, and Max.
John: Are there any nice areas to take a four-legged friend for a walk?
Nana: You can take them to areas such as hundeskove, which is a dog park, but it literally means “dog woods.”
John: Nice! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: brug [natural native speed]
John: use, need, want
Nana: brug [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: brug [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: være nødt til [natural native speed]
John: to have to
Nana: være nødt til [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: være nødt til [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: kø [natural native speed]
John: queue, line
Nana: kø [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: kø [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: nødstilfælde [natural native speed]
John: emergency
Nana: nødstilfælde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nødstilfælde [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tandlæge [natural native speed]
John: dentist
Nana: tandlæge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tandlæge [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: røntgen [natural native speed]
John: X-ray
Nana: røntgen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: røntgen [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: hul [natural native speed]
John: hole, cavity
Nana: hul [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: hul [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: nerve [natural native speed]
John: nerve
Nana: nerve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nerve [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: rodbehandling [natural native speed]
John: root canal treatment
Nana: rodbehandling [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: rodbehandling [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: såmænd [natural native speed]
John: actually, really
Nana: såmænd [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: såmænd [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: have brug for
John: meaning "to need." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This phrase consists of the irregular verb have, the neuter gender noun brug,
John: which means "use,"
Nana: and the preposition for, which means "for."
John: It doesn’t make much sense when you look at it literally, so just remember that it means “to need” or “to want.”
Nana: Yes. You can follow the phrase with whatever it is that you need or want.
John: Is there anything that we need to remember about using this in a sentence?
Nana: If it’s an action, you need the infinitive marker at before the verb.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Alle har brug for nogen, de kan stole på.
John: ...which means "Everybody needs someone they can trust."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: snyde foran i køen
John: Meaning "to cut in front of the line." Can you break this expression down for us, Nana?
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb snyde,
John: which means "to cheat,"
Nana: and the second word is the adverb foran, which means "in front.”
John: And the third and fourth words?
Nana: The third word is the preposition i,
John: which means "in,"
Nana: and finally we have the common gender noun kø in definite form. That means "the line.”
John: And it’s used like it is in English: to say that someone is cutting in line.
Nana: If someone cuts to the very front of the line, you can replace foran with the adjective forrest, which means "front."
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Du kan ikke bare snyde foran i køen.
John: ...which means "You cannot just cut in front of the line."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: såmænd bare
John: Meaning "really just." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: The phrase consists of the adverb såmænd,
John: which means "actually" or "really,"
Nana: and the adverb bare, which means "just" or "only."
John: How do we use this phrase?
Nana: You can use it to describe an adjective or a verb.
John: It’s a way of saying that something is simply this or that.
Nana: Or that you’re simply doing something.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Det er såmænd bare en lille tak for jeres hjælp.
John: ...which means "It is really just a small thanks for your help." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to explain what happened at the dentist's.
John: What’ll we be looking at in this lesson, Nana?
Nana: Reflexive verbs. These are verbs that go together with the reflexive pronoun sig, which means “oneself.”
John: You can use these verbs when expressing how you feel or that you’re doing something to yourself.
Nana: Or when you want to express the particular meaning of a verb used with sig.
John: Transitive verbs are often used with this reflexive pronoun.
Nana: That’s right, so you need one or more direct objects. We can also use intransitive verbs with sig to show that an action is being done to a second or third party or object.
John: Let’s look at an example, first with a transitive verb.
Nana: Sætte is an irregular transitive verb which means “to put.” When it’s a reflexive verb with sig, it means “to sit down,” as in “to sit yourself down.”
John: And an example of an intransitive verb?
Nana: We’ll use the very similar sidde, a regular transitive verb meaning “to sit.”
John: What does this mean when it’s a reflexive verb?
Nana: Actually, sidde is one of those intransitive verbs that cannot form a reflexive verb with the reflexive pronoun.
John: Oh right, okay!
Nana: Lægge, meaning “to lay,” and ligge, meaning “to lie,” are another similar example.
John: Hmm, they sound very similar. What’s the difference?
Nana: Ligge is an intransitive verb that cannot make a reflexive verb.
John: But you can make a reflexive verb out of the transitive verb in that pair?
Nana: Right, when lægge forms a reflexive verb with sig, it means “to lay down,” as in “to lay yourself down.”
John: There are many more examples in the lesson notes, listeners, so do check them out! Next, let’s go back to compound verbs.
Nana: Right, we talked about these before in a previous lesson.
John: To recap, there are solid and loose, or real and fake, compound verbs. Some of these compound verbs are made with prefixes.
Nana: Another two prefixes that I’d like to introduce are op and ned.
John: which mean “up” and “down.” Let’s hear some examples.
Nana: The loose compound remse op means “to list.” The solid compound opremse also means “to list.”
John: Sometimes the meaning is the same or similar; sometimes it’s different.
Nana: Yes. Take the loose compound komme ned, which means “to come down,” and the solid compound nedkomme, which means...
John: “To give birth.” Yeah, those are completely different!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

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Monday at 06:30 PM
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What can you tell us about the dogs in your own country?

Roger
Thursday at 03:17 PM
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Jeg kan godt lide border collies, fordi de er meget intelligente. Nogle hunderacer er begrænset i England, men jeg ved ikke, hvilken.