Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 21 - An Interview with a Danish Celebrity. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about asking meaningful questions with interrogative adverbs. The conversation takes place at a studio.
Nana: It's between Mia and Villads.
John: The speakers are strangers. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mia: I dag byder vi velkommen til singer-songwriter Villads, som vil spille sin nye single for os om lidt.
Villads: Mange tak for invitationen.
Mia: Nå, Villads, hvornår vidste du, at du ville være sanger?
Villads: Det har jeg vidst, siden jeg var barn. Jeg har altid haft stor interesse for musik.
Mia: Hvor længe har det taget dig at lære at spille guitar?
Villads: Jeg begyndte, da jeg var 10, men det var først 4 år senere, at jeg virkelig begyndte at øve mig.
Mia: Så det har kun taget dig 4 år at blive så god som du er i dag? Hvor øvede du dig?
Villads: Mest på mit værelse. Mine forældre købte dog høretelefoner til mig, da jeg skiftede til el-guitar.
Mia: Ha ha, det var måske for deres egen skyld? Hvordan finder du inspiration til dine tekster?
Villads: Det er forskelligt. Det kan være, når jeg går ned ad en gade, eller når jeg ser min smukke kæreste.
Mia: Hvorfor har alle de søde fyre altid en kæreste?
Villads: Ha ha, jeg er sikker på, der er mange søde fyre derude, som ikke har kærester.
Mia: Tak fordi du ville komme og være med i vores elevpodcast. Her er Villads med sin nye single!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Mia: Today, we welcome singer-songwriter Villads, who will play his new single for us in a bit.
Villads: Thank you very much for the invitation.
Mia: So, Villads, when did you know that you wanted to be a singer?
Villads: I've known since I was a child. I've always had a great interest in music.
Mia: How long has it taken you to learn to play guitar?
Villads: I started when I was 10, but it wasn't until 4 years later that I really started practicing.
Mia: So it has only taken you 4 years to become as good as you are today? Where did you practice?
Villads: Mostly in my room. My parents, however, bought me headphones when I switched to electric guitar.
Mia: Ha ha, perhaps it was for their own sake? How do you find inspiration for your lyrics?
Villads: It differs. It can be when I'm walking down a street, or when I see my beautiful girlfriend.
Mia: Why do all the cute guys always have girlfriends?
Villads: Ha ha, I'm sure there are many nice guys out there who don't have girlfriends.
Mia: Thank you for coming and joining our student podcast. Here's Villads with his new single!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Wow, there was a celebrity in the conversation this time!
Nana: Yes...something like that! It was interesting to hear his story of how he became a singer.
John: Yeah, sounds like it was a lifelong dream.
Nana: I’m glad that Villads is making it happen!
John: How do new musicians go about getting discovered in Denmark?
Nana: Like in a lot of other countries, you can apply for a TV talent show.
John: What talent shows are popular?
Nana: The X Factor and Talent. But, it’s rare for even the winners to have more than fifteen minutes of fame.
John: I think that sometimes the runners-up do better out of those contests.
Nana: I think so too. If talent shows don’t work out, you can also try the annual SPOT festival for up-and-coming talents from all over Scandinavia.
John: Is social media a good route?
Nana: Yes, many artists try promoting themselves and getting their name out there via Facebook or Instagram.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: byde [natural native speed]
John: to ask, to invite, to offer, to command, to bid, to subject to
Nana: byde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: byde [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: om lidt [natural native speed]
John: in a bit
Nana: om lidt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: om lidt [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: vide [natural native speed]
John: to know
Nana: vide [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: vide [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: interesse [natural native speed]
John: interest
Nana: interesse [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: interesse [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: øve [natural native speed]
John: to practice
Nana: øve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: øve [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: høretelefon [natural native speed]
John: headphone
Nana: høretelefon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: høretelefon [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tekst [natural native speed]
John: text, words, lyrics
Nana: tekst [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tekst [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: forskellig [natural native speed]
John: different
Nana: forskellig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: forskellig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: gå [natural native speed]
John: to go, to walk
Nana: gå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: gå [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: elevpodcast [natural native speed]
John: student podcast
Nana: elevpodcast [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: elevpodcast [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Nana: byde velkommen
John: meaning "to welcome, to greet." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: This phrase consists of the irregular verb byde,
John: which has several meanings such as "to bid,"
Nana: and the adjective velkommen, which means "welcome.”
John: How can you use this phrase?
Nana: You can use it when welcoming or greeting someone or something, most often a person or a group of people.
John: Can you just say “Welcome?”
Nana: Yes, that’s Velkommen.
John: Can you give us an example using the longer phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Jeg vil gerne byde alle velkommen.
John: ...which means "I would like to welcome everyone."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: have interesse for
John: Meaning "to have interest in." Can you break down this expression for us?
Nana: Sure. The first word is have
John: the irregular verb "to have,"
Nana: the second word is interesse
John: the common gender noun "interest,"
Nana: and the third word for is the preposition "for."
John: So, altogether, this means “to have an interest in” something.
Nana: Yes, you can follow the phrase with either an object or an action describing what you have an interest in.
John: Are there any other ways to say this?
Nana: You can use the phrase være interesseret i, which literally means "to be interested in."
John: Can you give us an example using “to have interest in?”
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Hun har stor interesse for at skrive artikler.
John: ...which means "She has great interest in writing articles."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: være forskellig
John: Meaning "to differ." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This phrase consists of the irregular verb være,
John: which means "to be,"
Nana: and the adjective forskellig, which means "different."
John: This is used to say that something is different from something or someone else.
Nana: It can also be used when something differs or varies.
John: Is there anything we should be mindful of regarding this phrase?
Nana: Don’t confuse forskellig with anderledes. Although that means “different” too, it has a nuance of “not normal” and even slightly weird.
John: Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Hvis ikke alle var forskellige, ville det være kedeligt."
John: ...which means "If everyone weren't different, it would be boring." Indeed! Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to ask meaningful questions with interrogative adverbs.
John: Let’s start by looking at the sentence structure.
Nana: In main clauses, the subject precedes the verb. If there’s an adverb in the sentence, it’s placed at the end or at the beginning.
John: Are there any exceptions to that?
Nana: When an adverb of time or place introduces a sentence, you change the word order. The verb precedes the subject.
John: Are there any other situations where you change the word order like this?
Nana: Yes, it’s called inversion. You also do this in questions.
John: So the simplest of Danish sentences would be structured like...
Nana: Subject, then a verb.
John: And the simplest question?
Nana: Interrogative, followed by a verb, followed by a subject. The verb and subject change order.
John: Let’s look at some words that we can use to ask questions.
Nana: You can use the interrogative adverbs hvornår and hvor længe.
John: They mean “when” and “how long,” respectively. They go at the beginning of the sentence.
Nana: Hvornår optrådte du for første gang?
John: “When did you perform for the first time?”
Nana: Hvor længe varede interviewet?
John: “How long did the interview last?”
Nana: Two more interrogative adverbs are hvordan and hvorfor.
John: These mean “how” and “why,” respectively. Again, they go at the beginning of the sentence.
Nana: Hvordan føles det at være kendt?
John: “How does it feel to be famous?”
Nana: Hvorfor har vi ikke mødt hinanden tidligere?
John: “Why haven’t we met each other earlier?”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

5 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Let's practice the interrogative adverbs you just learned in the comments!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:16 PM
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Hi Tricia,


Thank you for using our services.

We are glad that you are enjoying our content.


Please keep up the good work.


Kindly

Anna Maria

Team DanishClass101.com

DanishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:35 PM
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Hi Roger.


Thank you for your contribution.


In Danish, we've been using the English word "lockdown" or the word "nedlukning". "Låsning" is a very rare word.


Apart from that, the first sentence is good. The second one should be like this:


Hvorfor er nedlukningen stadig ikke slut?


Like in English, "tackle" has a "c" in it.


Have a nice day.


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Tricia Yourkevich
Tuesday at 01:26 AM
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I love that you mentioned Spot Festival in this lesson!

Roger
Saturday at 02:52 PM
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Hvornår slutter låsningen?

Hvorfor afsluttede låsningen stadig ikke?

Hvordan takler du lukningen?