Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 23 - Understanding a Danish Tenancy Agreement. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to plan actions for others. The conversation takes place in the car.
Nana: It's between Helle and Johan.
John: The speakers are family members. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Helle: Nå, hvad siger du til lejekontrakten? Er du tilfreds indtil videre?
Johan: Ja, lejen er inklusive el, vand og varme. Men jeg betaler selv for internet og tv.
Helle: Får man vasket trappen, eller skal beboerne skiftes til at vaske den?
Johan: Jeg skal have læst den del ordentligt senere. Jeg kan vel også få dig til det?
Helle: Er det svært at få kæmpet sig igennem paragrafferne? Hvad står der under 'Inventar'?
Johan: Der er vaskemaskine!!! Og man må holde husdyr! Så kan I få passet hunden.
Helle: Så behøver du ikke at få ordnet vasketøj derhjemme. Fik du aftalt en dato for indflytningssynet?
Johan: Det bliver dagen efter indflytningen. Jeg håber, jeg kan få nogle til at hjælpe.
Helle: Jeg er lettet over, at udlejeren står for både den indvendige og udvendige vedligeholdelse.
Johan: Ja, men jeg er bekymrer mig lidt om depositummet og den forudbetalte leje.
Helle: Svarer depositummet ikke bare til tre måneders leje?
Johan: Jo, men det gør den forudbetalte leje også, så indbetalingen svarer til 6 måneders leje i alt.
Helle: Velkommen til voksenlivet, min dreng!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Helle: So, what do you think about the tenancy agreement? Are you satisfied so far?
Johan: Yes, the rent includes electricity, water, and heating. But I have to pay for the internet and tv myself.
Helle: Do you get the stairs washed, or do the residents take turns washing them?
Johan: I need to read that part properly later. I guess I can have you read it too?
Helle: Is it hard struggling through the paragraphs? What does it say under "Inventory items?"
Johan: There's a washing machine!!! And you can keep pets! So I can look after the dog.
Helle: Then you don't have to get your laundry done at home. Did you arrange a date for the move-in inspection?
Johan: It'll be on the day after moving in. I hope I can get some people to help.
Helle: I'm relieved that the landlord is responsible for both the interior and exterior maintenance.
Johan: Yes, but I'm a little worried about the deposit and the prepaid rent.
Helle: Isn't the deposit just the equivalent of three months' rent?
Johan: Yeah, but so is the prepaid rent, so the payment is the equivalent of 6 months' rent in total.
Helle: Welcome to adulthood, my boy!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Apartment hunting is a drag in any country.
Nana: I think so too. There are so many things to think about, and it’s so expensive.
John: What’s the housing market like in Denmark?
Nana: For the last decade or so, the prices for owner-occupied flats have gone up every year.
John: Do prices depend on location?
Nana: Of course. In and around the capital, prices range between about 20.000- 45.000 kroner per square meter.
John: How about in more rural areas?
Nana: They can be as low as 7.000 kroner per square meter.
John: Wow, big difference! How about apartments, like the one in the dialogue?
Nana: They range between approximately 3.000-10.000 kroner per month. The monthly rent for non-penthouse apartments is usually between 4.500-20.000 kroner.
John: It sounds like there’s a quite a range out there.
Nana: Yes, you can find both cheaper and more expensive apartments. It just depends on your budget and taste.
John: Right. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: lejekontrakt [natural native speed]
John: tenancy agreement, lease
Nana: lejekontrakt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lejekontrakt [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tilfreds [natural native speed]
John: content, satisfied, pleased
Nana: tilfreds [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tilfreds [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: leje [natural native speed]
John: rent
Nana: leje [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: leje [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: beboer [natural native speed]
John: tenant, resident
Nana: beboer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: beboer [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: skiftes [natural native speed]
John: to take turns
Nana: skiftes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: skiftes [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: kæmpe [natural native speed]
John: to fight, to struggle
Nana: kæmpe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: kæmpe [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: husdyr [natural native speed]
John: domestic animal
Nana: husdyr [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: husdyr [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: indflytningssyn [natural native speed]
John: move-in inspection
Nana: indflytningssyn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: indflytningssyn [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: lettet [natural native speed]
John: relieved
Nana: lettet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lettet [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: bekymre [natural native speed]
John: to worry, to trouble, to concern
Nana: bekymre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: bekymre [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: kæmpe sig igennem
John: meaning "to fight through." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Nana: The first word is the regular verb kæmpe,
John: which means "to fight",
Nana: then the pronoun sig,
John: which means things like "himself," or "herself,"
Nana: and finally the adverb igennem, which means "through."
John: You use this phrase when fighting through something, like a tough time.
Nana: It can be something both physically and mentally challenging.
John: Is there anything we need to remember about this phrase?
Nana: Remember to conjugate the reflexive pronoun sig according to the person!
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Kvinden kæmpede sig igennem det tykke dokument.
John: ...which means "The woman fought through the thick document."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: holde husdyr
John: Meaning "to keep domestic animals, to keep pets." Let’s go through this phrase word by word.
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb holde
John: which means "to hold,"
Nana: and the second word is the neuter gender noun husdyr,
John: which means "domestic animal." I think that the meaning is pretty easy to decipher from those words.
Nana: Right. Sometimes husdyr is replaced with the actual word for "pet." This is kæledyr in Danish.
John: Can you give us an example using our original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Det er ikke tilladt at holde husdyr her.
John: ...which means "It is not allowed to keep domestic animals here."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: bekymre sig
John: Meaning "to worry." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: The regular verb bekymre means "to worry." The pronoun sig means things like "himself," or "herself.”
John: This phrase is used to express worry or concern.
Nana: The reflexive pronoun sig conjugates according to the person.
John: How do we use this to say that we’re worrying other people?
Nana: You replace sig with, for example, a name, a personal pronoun, or a noun.
John: Can you give us an example using a pronoun?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Du bekymrer dig alt for meget.
John: ...which means "You worry way too much." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about planning actions for others.
John: For this, the first thing we’ll look at is causative sentences. These are sentences that show that you’ve made or caused someone or something to do something.
Nana: In Danish, we use the irregular verb få, which means “to get.”
John: What’s the sentence structure in present tense infinitive?
Nana: First you need the subject, then får, then whoever or whatever you caused to do the action. This is followed by til, at, and an infinitive verb.
John: How about for past tense infinitive?
Nana: It’s the same, only with fik instead of får. For example, Han får sin mor til at gennemgå kontrakten med ham.
John: “He gets his mother to go through the lease with him.” Let’s hear another example sentence.
Nana: De fik venner og familie til at bære flyttekasser.
John: “They got friends and family to carry moving boxes.” But what if the agent is unknown, or you’re the agent?
Nana: In this case, you still use få. But you need the past participle of another verb followed by an object. Få is an auxiliary verb.
John: Let’s hear some examples.
Nana: Drengen får vasket sit tøj derhjemme.
John: “The boy gets his clothes washed at home.”
Nana: Hun fik ikke flyttekasserne samlet.
John: “She did not get the moving boxes assembled.” Ok, how about the future tense?
Nana: You need skal, which is the modal verb skulle in present tense. This means “to have to” or “to be to.”
John: What’s the sentence structure?
Nana: You can use the pattern skal have, plus the past participle of a verb.
John: This is for talking about positive or negative actions performed by someone who’s unknown or performed by you in the future. One last example?
Nana: De skal have rengjort lejligheden i morgen.
John: “They are to get the apartment cleaned tomorrow.”
Nana: Familien skal have deres hund passet til sommer.
John: “The family is to get their dog looked after this summer.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

2 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Are you planning on moving to Denmark?

Roger
Monday at 03:16 PM
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Jeg vil ikke flytte til Danmark.

Jeg vil gerne besøge Danmark næste år, men jeg vil gerne blive en dansk til engelsk oversætter.