Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 24 - Doing the Math in Denmark. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to solve math problems. The conversation takes place in a classroom.
Nana: It's between Carsten and Mia.
John: The speakers are a teacher and student. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Carsten: Mia, kan du reducere følgende stykke? Hvis du starter med at læse udtrykket igennem.
Mia: Okay. 3 + (8 - 2x) - (x + 3y) + 4y - 5.
Carsten: Godt. Hvad vil du gøre først?
Mia: Først vil jeg ophæve de to parenteser. Den første kan jeg ophæve med det samme.
Carsten: Og hvorfor kan du det?
Mia: Fordi det er en plusparentes. Så skal jeg ikke gøre noget.
Carsten: Ja, og hvad så med den anden parentes?
Mia: Der skifter alle fortegnene, fordi det er en minusparentes. Så plusset bliver til et minus.
Carsten: Ja, og hvad står der så nu?
Mia: 3 + 8 - 2x - x - 3y + 4y - 5. Og så skal jeg sortere leddene, ikke?
Carsten: Præcis! Tallene for sig, leddene med x for sig og leddene med y for sig.
Mia: Okay, så det vil sige 3 + 8 - 5 - 2x - x - 3y + 4y.
Carsten: Ja, så nu skal du bare lægge de forskellige ting sammen.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Carsten: Mia, can you reduce the following problem? If you would start by reading through the expression.
Mia: Okay. 3 + (8 - 2x) - (x + 3y) + 4y - 5.
Carsten: Good. What will you do first?
Mia: First, I will remove the two parentheses. I can remove the first one straight away.
Carsten: And why can you do that?
Mia: Because it is preceded by a plus sign. Then I don't have to do anything.
Carsten: Yes, and what about the other parenthesis then?
Mia: All the signs change because it is preceded by a minus sign. So the plus sign becomes a minus sign.
Carsten: Yes, so what does it say now?
Mia: 3 + 8 - 2x - x - 3y + 4y - 5. And then I'm going to sort the terms, right?
Carsten: Exactly! The numbers for themselves, the terms with x for themselves, and the terms with y for themselves.
Mia: Okay, so that means 3 + 8 - 5 - 2x - x - 3y + 4y.
Carsten: Yes, so now you only have to add the different things.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I think I’m having a nightmare.
Nana: Why?
John: I just heard some math equations...
Nana: Math isn’t that bad! Don’t overreact!
John: I thought I was learning Danish, not math!
Nana: You can learn both! There have been many famous Danish mathematicians.
John: Like who?
Nana: Harald Bohr. His greatest contribution was his theory on almost periodic functions, dating back to 1925.
John: Anyone else?
Nana: Bohr published a textbook with fellow mathematician Johannes Mollerup on mathematical analysis. The Bohr-Mollerup theorem, characterizing the gamma function, is named after the two.
John: I think I remember that one from my college days.
Nana: There is also Johan Jensen, who contributed the Jensen's inequality and Jensen's formula. Both form important statements.
John: Okay, so maybe we can learn both at the same time. But now onto the vocab!
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: reducere [natural native speed]
John: to reduce
Nana: reducere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: reducere [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: stykke [natural native speed]
John: piece, slice, problem (math)
Nana: stykke [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: stykke [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: udtryk [natural native speed]
John: expression, look, phrase, term
Nana: udtryk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: udtryk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ophæve [natural native speed]
John: to remove, to lift, to abolish, to annul, to cancel
Nana: ophæve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ophæve [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: plusparentes [natural native speed]
John: parenthesis preceded by a plus sign
Nana: plusparentes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: plusparentes [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: fortegn [natural native speed]
John: preceding sign
Nana: fortegn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fortegn [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: minusparentes [natural native speed]
John: parenthesis preceded by a minus sign
Nana: minusparentes [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: minusparentes [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: sortere [natural native speed]
John: to sort, to sort out
Nana: sortere slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: sortere [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: led [natural native speed]
John: term, link, joint, gate
Nana: led [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: led [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: sig [natural native speed]
John: himself, herself, itself, oneself, themselves
Nana: sig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: sig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: følgende stykke
John: meaning "following problem." Shall we break down this expression?
Nana: Let’s. The first word is følgende,
John: an adjective meaning "following."
Nana: And the second word is stykke,
John: In this case, it means "problem," as in a mathematical problem. How’s this phrase used?
Nana: Although there’s no definite article introducing the phrase, the English equivalent is "the following problem.”
John: So it’s used when talking about math problems.
Nana: Sometimes the definite article det will be present, but the meaning stays the same. Remember det as a definite article means "the."
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Vi fandt fejl i følgende stykker.
John: ...which means "We found errors in the following problems."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: ophæve parentes
John: Meaning "to remove parenthesis." What can you tell us about this phrase.?
Nana: This phrase consists of the regular verb ophæve,
John: which has several meanings such as "to abolish,"
Nana: and the common gender noun parentes, which means "parenthesis."
John: The meaning of this one is pretty easy to figure out. And, it’s another one that you’ll hear when talking about math.
Nana: Yes. The verb ophæve is sometimes used interchangeably with the very similar regular verb hæve. Hæve also has several meanings.
John: Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, De er klar til at ophæve parenteserne.
John: ...which means "They are ready to remove the parentheses."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: for sig
John: Meaning "for oneself, separately." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: The first word for is the preposition "for." The second word, sig, is a pronoun that covers “himself.” “herself,” “oneself.” things like that.
John: This is used when talking about how something is separate from something else.
Nana: If you put a noun in front of the phrase, you can show what is separate.
John: That’s easy.
Nana: Also, when talking about the way of sorting something, the pronoun hver is added at the front of the phrase.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Arkene er i en bunke for sig.
John: ...which means "The sheets are in a pile for themselves."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about solving math problems.
John: Back to math?
Nana: First, let’s look at the present tense and future tense.
John: In Danish, it’s very common to use the present tense as the future tense as well. The present tense is often used with adverbs of time that refer to the future.
Nana: It’s also used in subordinate clauses of time that begin with the conjunction når, which means “when,” or the conjunction hvis, which means “if.
John: How do we conjugate verbs into present tense?
Nana: You usually add -r to the infinitive verb. But, there are some irregular verbs.
John: There is a table of these in the lesson notes. But first, let’s look at some sample sentence.
Nana: Læreren kommer senere i dag.
John: “The teacher will come later today.”
Nana: De laver lektierne, hvis de får tidligere fri end normalt.
John: “They will do the homework, if they finish school earlier than usual.”
Nana: In the last lesson, we talked about the modal verb skulle. It can also be an auxiliary verb when used with another verb in infinitive form.
John: How do you use this verb in future tense?
Nana: When conjugating skulle in present tense, you can use it with a verb in infinitive form to express the future tense.
John: Again, let’s see some examples.
Nana: Han skal forberede opgaverne.
John: “He is going to prepare the exercises.”
Nana: Jeg skal have kage som belønning senere.
John: “I am going to have cake as a reward later.”
Nana: You can also use ville with a verb in infinitive form to make the future tense.
John: It differs from the previous pattern, because you express what you think will happen. You’re predicting the future. Can we have an example?
Nana: Eleverne vil feste efter eksamenen.
John: “The students will party after the exam.”
Nana: Hendes lærer vil være på kontoret klokken 11.
John: “Her teacher will be at the office at 11 AM.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

2 Comments

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Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you feel confident about solving math problems in Danish now? Let's practice!

Roger
Tuesday at 02:47 PM
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Carsten og Mia har til sammen 5 epler. Carsten har to. Hvor mange har Mia?

Som likning kan dette skrives:

2 + x = 5

x = 5-2

x= 3

Mia har 3 epler