Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 11 - A Series of Unfortunate Accidents at a Danish Restaurant. John here.
Nana: Hej, I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll review ways to apologize. The conversation takes place at a café.
Nana: It's between Jon, Helle, and Mia.
John: Two speakers are family members and the third is a stranger in a customer service context. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Jon: Åh, undskyld. Jeg glemte det med nødderne. Nu skal jeg fjerne dem med det samme.
Helle: Er du ude på at slå mig ihjel?! Sagde jeg ikke tydeligt, at jeg ikke kan tåle nødder?!
Jon: Det må I virkelig undskylde. Den tager jeg på min kappe.
Mia: Rolig nu, mor. Du har da aldrig taget skade af en enkelt nød.
Helle: Sidste gang kunne jeg næsten ikke trække vejret! Heldigvis var din bror der til at hjælpe.
Mia: Hold nu op! Jeg ville jo gerne være kommet til din fødselsdag, men jeg kunne ikke.
Helle: Selv dine kusiner var der!
Jon: Jeg beklager fejlen. Her er nogle flæskesvær i stedet for. De er selvfølgelig på husets regning.
Helle: Hvad er det, som du ikke forstår?! Min datter er veganer!
Mia: Mor, lad nu være. Hør, har I ikke nogle chips, som vi kan få i stedet for?
Jon: Det har vi i hvert fald. Jeg er virkelig ked af alt det her rod. Et øjeblik.
Helle: Jeg burde tale med din chef!
Mia: Han har jo sagt undskyld. Ligesom jeg har op til flere gange!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Jon: Oh, sorry. I forgot the thing about the nuts. I'll remove them straight away.
Helle: Are you trying to kill me?! Didn't I say clearly that I can't tolerate nuts?!
Jon: I am truly sorry. I'm to blame for that.
Mia: Calm down, mom. You have never been harmed by a single nut.
Helle: Last time I almost couldn't breathe! Luckily, your brother was there to help.
Mia: Cut it out! I really wanted to come to your birthday, but I couldn't.
Helle: Even your cousins were there!
Jon: I'm sorry about the mistake. Here are some pork rinds instead. They are on the house, of course.
Helle: What is it that you don't understand! My daughter is vegan!
Mia: Mom, don't! Listen, don't you have any chips that we can have instead?
Jon: We certainly do. I'm really sorry about all this mess. One moment.
Helle: I ought to speak to your boss!
Mia: He has said sorry. Like I have several times!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Enter Post conversation Banter section here.
John: I don’t know whether to feel sorry for Jon or not. He’s being shouted at a lot, but he clearly isn’t doing a very good job either.
Nana: Ha ha, no, he isn’t. But Mia is a little embarrassed by her mother telling him off so much.
John: It’s not easy being a waiter.
Nana: No it isn’t, especially when you aren’t one of the tjeneruddannede, like a lot of waitstaff.
John: What does that word mean?
Nana: We use it to refer to people who are trained as waitstaff.
John: Oh, right. Are there many students that work in restaurants?
Nana: Yeah, there are. But some restaurants will only hire people that are trained.
John: More upscale and expensive restaurants, I assume.
Nana: Some people start out without training, then get good at the job and decide to stay at it.
John: Sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference between the professional with training and the student with none.
Nana: I don’t really care who serves me as long as they get my order right!
John: I hear you. Now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: det [natural native speed]
John: it, that, the, so, things, the thing
Nana: det [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: det [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: fjerne [natural native speed]
John: to remove
Nana: fjerne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fjerne [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: slå ihjel [natural native speed]
John: to kill
Nana: slå ihjel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: slå ihjel [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tåle [natural native speed]
John: to take, to bear, to stand, to put up with, to tolerate
Nana: tåle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tåle [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: vejr [natural native speed]
John: breath, weather
Nana: vejr [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: vejr [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: kusine [natural native speed]
John: female cousin
Nana: kusine [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: kusine [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: fejl [natural native speed]
John: mistake, error, defect, flaw, shortcoming, fault
Nana: fejl [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fejl [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: i hvert fald [natural native speed]
John: in any case, at any rate, definitely
Nana: i hvert fald [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: i hvert fald [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: rod [natural native speed]
John: disorder, mess, root
Nana: rod [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: rod [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: chef [natural native speed]
John: boss
Nana: chef [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: chef [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: det med
John: ...meaning "the thing with." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: The phrase consists of the pronoun det, in this case meaning "the thing,” and the preposition med, which means "with," "by," or "in."
John: How is it used?
Nana: You can use this phrase when turning actions into a thing.
John: Can you give us an example using this construction?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Jeg er ikke så god til det med vinskænkning.
John: ...which means "I am not so good at the thing with wine pouring."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: tåle nødder
John: Meaning "to tolerate nuts." Can you break this phrase down for us, Nana?
Nana: Of course. The first word tåle is a regular verb with several meanings, such as "to take" or "to tolerate." The second word is the common gender noun nød in plural indefinite form, meaning "nuts."
John: So this means being able to tolerate nuts.
Nana: Right. You can change nødder to anything that you can tolerate.
John: Does it have to be used for food and allergies?
Nana: No, it can be anything.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Heldigvis kunne alle tåle nødder.
John: ...which means "Luckily, everyone could tolerate nuts."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: trække vejret
John: Meaning "to breathe." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The phrase consists of the irregular verb trække, which means "to drag" or "to pull," and the neuter gender noun vejr in definite form. When vejr follows trække, it means "the breath."
John: How is this verb used?
Nana: We use this to describe the act of breathing.
John: How about if someone can’t breath?
Nana: Trække becomes interchangeable with the irregular verb få, which means "to get." For example, Vi kan ikke få vejret herinde.
John: This means "We cannot breathe in here." Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Han trækker vejret udenfor.
John: ...which means "He is breathing outside." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll review ways to apologize.
John: Let’s look at this in more detail.
Nana: In previous lessons, we covered the interjection undskyld which means “sorry.”
John: It can be used on its own, or as an introduction to a longer apology.
Nana: It is often used with the modal verb ville, which means “to want to.” It’s also often used with the modal verb måtte, which means “to have to.”
John: How do we make a sentence with it?
Nana: ville in present or past tense plus gerne, meaning “gladly,” and then undskylde.
John: How about with the other modal verb.
Nana: måtte in present or past tense plus undskylde.
John: Can we have some examples please?
Nana: Tjeneren ville gerne undskylde.
John: “The waiter wanted to apologise.”
Nana: I må undskylde fejltagelsen.
John: “You must excuse the mistake.” What’s the next way to apologize?
Nana: The phrase Være ked af det. It literally means “to be sad,” but can be used for “to be sorry.”
John: Let’s hear an example.
Nana: Var gæsterne kede af det?
John: “Were the guests sorry?” or “Were the guests sad?”
Nana: Er synderen ikke ked af det?
John: “Is the sinner not sorry?” or “Is the sinner not sad?” And one final way...
Nana: You can use the verb beklage. This is a regular verb that means “to regret” or “to be sorry.”
John: Using this verb, how do we say “the young man is sorry?”
Nana: Den unge mand beklager.
John: How about “I am sorry about that?”
Nana:Det beklager jeg.
John: Thank you!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

4 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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How would you apologize in a formal situation in Denmark?

Roger
Wednesday at 02:52 PM
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Unskylde for fejlen, jeg er ked af det.

Det beklager mig.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:44 PM
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Hi Steve.


Thanks for your question.


It's "Tjenere vil gerne unskylde".


Let us know if there are other things you're in doubt of.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Steve
Wednesday at 03:20 PM
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Hi. If 'Tjeneren ville gerne undskylde' translates to "The waiter wanted to apologize." then how would you say 'The waiter wants to apologise'?