Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 22 - Getting Your Technology Fix in Denmark. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn about deciding what to buy by comparing with adjectives. The conversation takes place at a store.
Nana: It's between Jon and Emily.
John: The speakers are a couple. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Jon: Her har de tablets! Hvilken farve kan du bedst lide? Sort, hvid eller guld?
Emilie: Den i sort matcher din mobil, men den hvide er også flot. Dog ikke så flot som den i guld.
Jon: Det ligner ikke, der er en farve, der er billigere end de andre.
Emilie: Hmm, vi kunne også se på et andet mærke. Måske finder vi en, der er bedre.
Jon: Tja, den her føles tungere, men til gengæld kan den køre på eget wi-fi.
Emilie: Hov, her står der, at de andre også kan.
Jon: Hmm, de er også nyest, kan jeg se.
Emilie: Tag den, som du tror, du bliver gladest for.
Jon: Det kan du sagtens sige. Priserne er højere end min første løn.
Emilie: Køb den i sort! Farven er den mest praktiske.
Jon: Men jeg regner alligevel med at købe et cover til den.
Emilie: Jamen, kan det så ikke være lige meget, hvilken farve du vælger?
Jon: Tænk, hvis jeg sagde det samme, når du skal vælge tøj.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Jon: They have tablets here! What color do you like the most? Black, white, or gold?
Emily: The one in black matches your phone, but the white one is also nice. Not as nice as the one in gold though.
Jon: It doesn't look like there's a color that's cheaper than the others.
Emily: Hmm, we could also look at a different brand. Maybe we'll find one that's better.
Jon: Well, this one feels heavier, but it can run on its own wi-fi.
Emily: Oh, here it says that the others can too.
Jon: Hmm, they’re also the newest, I see.
Emily: Take the one you think you'll be happiest with.
Jon: That's easy for you to say. The prices are higher than my first salary.
Emily: Buy it in black! The color is the most practical.
Jon: But I'm counting on buying a cover for it anyway.
Emily: But then does it matter what color you choose?
Jon: Imagine if I said the same when you're picking out clothes.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Lots of discussion about buying a tablet this time.
Nana: Yeah, most of the conversation seemed to be about which color to choose.
John: Other than price, color seemed to be the main difference between the different models.
Nana: They all came with wifi, which is a major selling point.
John: It is. What is the wifi service like in Denmark? As a tourist, how can you access the internet?
Nana: You can buy a prepaid sim card. But if you don’t want that, then you can find free wifi around.
John: What kind of places offer free wifi?
Nana: Your hotel or hostel probably will, as will cafes and McDonald’s.
John: How about libraries?
Nana: Most do, but not all, so you should check. Other places that offer wifi, such as buses and trains, usually advertise that they do. So keep an eye out for that information!
John: Is there good coverage throughout the country?
Nana: Denmark may be a small country, but there are still places that don’t have full coverage. So be aware of this!
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: lide [natural native speed]
John: to suffer
Nana: lide [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lide [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: eller [natural native speed]
John: or
Nana: eller [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: eller [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ligne [natural native speed]
John: to look like, to resemble, to be like, to be similar to
Nana: ligne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ligne [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: mærke [natural native speed]
John: mark, label, tag, brand, make
Nana: mærke [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: mærke [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: til gengæld [natural native speed]
John: in return, however
Nana: til gengæld [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: til gengæld [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: sagtens [natural native speed]
John: easily
Nana: sagtens [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: sagtens [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: løn [natural native speed]
John: pay
Nana: løn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: løn [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: regne [natural native speed]
John: to rain, to do sums, to reckon
Nana: regne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: regne [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: lige [natural native speed]
John: straight, equal, just, exactly, right
Nana: lige [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lige [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: vælge [natural native speed]
John: to choose, to select, to pick
Nana: vælge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: vælge [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: kunne lide
John: Meaning "to like, to be fond of." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This phrase consists of the modal verb kunne,
John: which means "can,"
Nana: and the verb lide, which on its own means "to suffer." However, in this fixed phrase it means "like."
John: So it means “to like” and you can use it to state what you like.
Nana: Yes, just add what you like after the phrase.
John: What about if you want to say something that you don’t like?
Nana: You simply add the adverb ikke, which means "not," after the modal verb.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase “to like?”
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Han kunne godt lide den første, de kiggede på.
John: ...which means "He liked the first one they looked at."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: regne med
John: Meaning "to count on, to depend on." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: Both words have several different meanings, but in this phrase, regne means "to count" and med means "on."
John: You can use this phrase when you are counting on someone, or on something to happen.
Nana: You just add that someone or something at the end of the phrase.
John: Can you give us an example using this expression?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Man kan ikke altid regne med hendes hjælp.
John: ...which means "You cannot always count on her help."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: være lige meget
John: Meaning "to not matter." Can you break this phrase down for us?
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb være
John: which means "to be."
Nana: The second word is the adjective lige.
John: This has several meanings, such as "equal.”
Nana: And the third word is the adverb meget, which means "much.”
John: Is this a fixed phrase?
Nana: Yes, it’s a fixed phrase that we use when something doesn’t matter.
John: Are there any variations on this phrase?
Nana: It can be used interchangeably with the phrase være ligegyldig, which was covered in a previous lesson.
John: Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Det er lige meget, hvad du mener.
John: ...which means "It does not matter what you think." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to decide what to buy by comparing with adjectives.
John: Do you have any tips for using adjectives?
Nana: The phrase så, plus adjective, plus som will come in handy.
John: This is the same as saying “as adjective as,” in English. So it’s used for things like “as tall as” or “as expensive as.”
Nana: Right. You can use this phrase when making comparisons.
John: But, don’t forget to conjugate the adjective according to number and gender of a noun. All right, let’s hear some examples.
Nana: Han er lige så ubeslutsom som hende.
John: “He is just as indecisive as she.”
Nana: Købet var lige så svært som beslutningen.
John: “The purchase was just as hard as the decision.” And how about an example that says something is “not” as adjective as something else?
Nana: Disse covere er ikke så kedelige som de andre.
John: “These covers are not as boring as the others.”
Nana: Another important thing with adjectives is the comparative.
John: We use this to compare two things. In English, it’s adjectives such as “taller,” “shorter,” or “more expensive.” In Danish, you have two options.
Nana: Right. You can add the ending -ere to a given adjective. Or, you can precede an adjective with the adjective mere.
John: This means “more” and is already in comparative form. Remember that some adjectives are irregular and conjugate differently.
Nana: Also, remember to conjugate the adjective according to the number and gender of a noun when using mere.
John: There are so many things to remember! I think an example will help us keep it straight.
Nana: Kameraerne var mere interessante end telefonerne.
John: “The cameras were more interesting than the phones.” And finally, let’s go over the superlative adjective. These are adjectives like “tallest” or “most expensive.” How do we make superlatives?
Nana: You can either add the ending -est or -st to a given adjective. Or, you can precede an adjective with the adjective mest.
John: Which means “most” and is already in superlative form. There are a few more rules when conjugating adjectives into superlative, so make sure to check out the lesson notes. Let’s finish the lesson with some more examples.
Nana: Det var den pæneste model.
John: “It was the nicest model.”
Nana: Den tungeste computer er ikke nødvendigvis mest holdbar.
John: “The heaviest computer is not necessarily the most durable.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

2 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Try making comparisons in Danish!

Roger
Sunday at 03:04 PM
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Den dyreste er ikke altid den bedste.

Han er så glad som en gris i lort.

At være hjemme hele tiden er lige så kedeligt som at se maling tørre.