Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Absolute Beginner, season 1, lesson 16, Wow! Using Danish Interjections Makes You Sound Like a Natural! I’m Gina.
Anna: Hej! And I’m Anna.
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use interjections as natural responses in a conversation.
Anna: This will definitely get you some cred.
Gina: So let’s get started!
Anna: The conversation takes place at William’s parents’ home, and it’s between William and Louise.
Gina: The speakers are siblings, and they’re speaking standard Danish.
DIALOGUE
William: Øh, har du set mine nøgler?
Louise: Tja... Måske.
William: Ej, kom nu.
Louise: Næh. Find dem selv.
William: Nå... Så gør jeg det.
Louise: Ta-da! Her er de!
William: Uhm, have you seen my keys?
Louise: Well...Maybe.
William: Oh, come on.
Louise: Nah. Find them yourself.
William: Oh...I will do that then.
Louise: Ta-da! Here they are!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Hey! It’s time for some Danish slang words.
Anna: Like in any other culture, the younger generation in Denmark tend to use a lot of slang when they’re talking.
Gina: Can you teach our listeners some of the most commonly used slang words?
Anna: Sure. You’ve already used one actually. Many young Danes say hey instead of hej, when they’re greeting each other, like we learned in a previous lesson.
Gina: What else can you teach us?
Anna: You can say something is skod instead of “bad.” The word literally means “cigarette butt.”
Gina: (laughs) So something must indeed be bad, when it’s skod. Let’s have another slang word.
Anna: Many people use the word herre instead of “very.”
Gina: If you want to say “It’s very funny,” you say...
Anna: Det er herre grineren. The last word grineren is actually slang for “funny.”
Gina: Those are some good suggestions.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Anna, what’s first?
Anna: Måske [pause] Måske.
Gina: This means “maybe,” “perhaps,” or “possibly.”
Anna: It’s very easy to learn, because it’s used in the same way as in English.
Gina: Great. What’s next?
Anna: Kom nu [pause] Kom nu. This phrase is composed of the word kom, which is the verb “come” in imperative form, and nu which means “now.”
Gina: So the phrase literally means “come now,” but is equivalent to “come on” in English. And it's often used to express impatience with someone who’s taking too long to do something. So, for example, if someone’s on the phone, and you have to be somewhere else soon, you can say it to that person.
Anna: Kom nu [pause] Kom nu.
Gina: Great. What’s next?
Anna: Selv [pause] Selv.
Gina: As a pronoun, it means “self” or “selves” and is used to indicate the words “myself,” “yourself,” “himself,” “herself,” “itself,” and “oneself. And “ourselves,” “yourselves,” and “themselves.”
Anna: Exactly. For example, in Danish, “I went by myself” is Jeg tog selv afsted.
Gina: The first word is the pronoun “I,” the second word means “went,” the third word means “myself,” and the last word means “off,” but it's not included in the English translation.
Anna: Jeg tog selv afsted.
Gina: As an adverb, selv means “even.”
Anna: Yes, and it’s used in the same way as in English.
Gina: Can you give us an example?
Anna: Selv dengang kunne de ikke enes.
Gina: This means “Even then they could not get along.”
Anna: Breaking it down, selv means “even,” dengang means “then,” de means “they,” kunne means “could,” ikke means “not,” and enes means “get along” or “agree.”
Gina: So that gives us…
Anna: Selv dengang kunne de ikke enes.
Gina: Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to respond naturally using interjections in a conversation.
Anna: Yes, and you have already heard some of the most common ones in the dialogue.
Gina: First we had...
Anna: Øh, which is equivalent to the English “umm” and is used to express hesitation, doubt, or perplexity.
Gina: Yes, and it's also used to fill in that pause you make while thinking about what to say next. Let’s hear it again.
Anna: Øh [pause] Øh.
Gina: The next interjection we heard was…
Anna: Tja [pause] Tja.
Gina: This is equivalent to the English “well” and is used to express hesitation or doubt.
Anna: Yes, for example, if you have to answer a difficult question, you can use tja to express your uncertainty. But it’s also used to tease people when withholding information.
Gina: For example if your brother is looking for his keys and you know where they are but you don’t want to tell him.
Anna: Yeah that’s right.
Gina: What else did we hear in the dialogue?
Anna: Ej [pause] Ej.
Gina: Depending on your tone, this interjection can be used to express annoyance and irritation, regret, reproach, surprise, and other feelings.
Anna: Yes, for example, dislike, disagreement, or discontent, as a reaction to something.
Gina: In English, it means something like “oh” or “wow.”
Anna: Yes, but ej can’t really be translated directly. It depends on the tone and context.
Gina: So what does it sound like if you’re annoyed?
Anna: Ej [annoyed tone] x2
Gina: And if you want to express regret?
Anna: Ej [regrettable tone] x2
Gina: How about surprise?
Anna: Ej [surprised tone] x2
Gina: Great. Next we heard…
Anna: Næh [pause] Næh. This is another way of saying nej, which means “no” and is equivalent to the English “nah.”
Gina: Therefore, it’s used to express denial, which is often influenced by hesitation or uncertainty. For example, if you look sad, but still say “Nah, I’m fine.”
Anna: In Danish, it becomes Næh, jeg har det fint [pause] Næh, jeg har det fint.
Gina: Word-for-word, it literally means “Nah, I have it fine,” but in regular English it’s “Nah, I’m fine.”
Anna: Næh can also be used to express admiration or surprise, if you use the right tone.
Gina: How does that sound?
Anna: Næh [admiring/surprised tone] x2
Gina: Finally, we heard the interjection…
Anna: Nå [pause] Nå.
Gina: Depending on the tone and the length of the vowel sound, this interjection can be used in seven main ways.
Anna: Yes, and some of these even contain additional options.
Gina: One thing is for sure though, nå usually appears at the beginning of a sentence. So, what’s the first way of using this interjection?
Anna: As a matter-of-fact declaratory reply – Nå can be used to express interest or lack of interest, understanding or realization, or skepticism.
Gina: If you think about nå as equivalent to “oh…,” “oh…!” and “huh…,” you have an idea of what the different tones should be like. What’s the second way of using this interjection?
Anna: As an opening to a statement – it can be used to summarize or end a conversation, or simply to change the topic.
Gina: In this case, it's equivalent to “well…” in English. What’s the third way of using nå?
Anna: As an expression of hesitation or doubt – it can be used when replying to unexpected questions.
Gina: Here, nå is equivalent to the English “oh.” What’s the fourth way of using this interjection?
Anna: As an expression of surprise – Nå can be used in situations where you discover that something wasn’t as you thought or expected.
Gina: In this case, it's also equivalent to the English “oh.” What’s the fifth way of using nå?
Anna: As an expression of impatience – It can be used in situations where you’ve been waiting for someone or for something to happen.
Gina: Once again, nå is equivalent to the English “ugh.” What’s the sixth way of using this interjection?
Anna: As an expression of threat – Nå can be used as a reaction to an action or a statement.
Gina: And finally, the seventh way of using nå is…
Anna: As a reaction to something or someone who’s cute or adorable. Or, as an expression of comfort. For example nå
Gina: When used this way, the vowel sound is particularly long.
Anna: Yes, because here, nå is equivalent to the English “aw,” and often used with children or animals.

Outro

Gina: Phew! Are you still with us, listeners? You’ve made it through to the end!
Anna: The interjections in this lesson make the Danish language come alive, so remember to check out the lesson notes for more examples and more info.
Gina: And leave us a comment at DanishClass101.com if you have any questions! In the mean time, thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

10 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hello Listeners! Which is your favorite Danish interjection?!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 05:24 PM
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Hello Marguerite,


Selv tak. Det var så lidt. 👍

Tak for dine kommentarer.


Cheers,


Linda

Team DanishClass101.com

Marguerite
Wednesday at 10:49 PM
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Mange tusind Tak Linda!

Marguerite

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 04:13 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Marguerite.


Thanks for your comment. You can search for the video lessons by using the searching field and tap in "video". Then all the different video lessons shows on the homepage. 😉

Best way to learn Danish is to follow the learning path that you are given after making your assessment test. It helps you to your level and help you to learn grammar, speaking and understanding. Every lesson has either a video or a audio that you can play. On Premium Plus you can interact with the tutor and ask question and be guided.

Best way to learn is to do a couple of leasson doing the week, read the grammar and use what you are learning through the week. And be patient with the learning process. 😜


Cheers,


Linda

DanishClass101.com

Marguerite
Wednesday at 01:57 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej!

After a few weeks some things are starting to make sense in terms of grammar but I am still finding learning Danish challenging. Having someone to practice with would be good, yet there isn't anyone. I feel I am learning lots of new things but have no way to review (other than working my flashcard) or practice putting sentences together . This could be because I am in Absolute Beginner and the next level will spiral on the basics.

That said, the interjection tja, I think for me, sounds like a good option so I can have extra time to figure out what I want to say. Yet, filler words are the things I try so hard to get out when talking to people in English, my native language, so I can sound confident. Tja, jeg synes det jeg vil gerne hjælpe. (Well, I tried. I was trying to say... Well, I think I could use extra help.)

I do still have some confusion also on how to use Danish 101 and am still trying to figure out the best strategy. I know at the end of the lesson in the closing it often talks about watching the videos. I have not known where they are. I may have found them yesterday. Are they the 3 minute videos with Louisa? I watched a few yesterday and they are very good! I did also find a few other things I added to my dashboard when I found these videos, but have no idea if this is the best method. If you have suggestions on a protocol/approach method, please advise me.

Mange tusind tak!

Marguerite

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH
Thursday at 09:13 PM
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Hej Amalie,


Ja, I am really have fun in learning danish from you :)


Mange Tak Amalie :)


Hej Hej,

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH

Team DanishClass101.com
Monday at 03:25 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH


Thank you for your comment and for sharing.


Hope you will continue to enjoy learning Danish with us.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH
Sunday at 02:05 AM
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Goddag Amalie,


Goddag og godmorgen is my favourite Amalie :)


Mange Tak,


Vi ses,

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH

Team DanishClass101.com
Monday at 03:09 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH


Thank you for commenting and for sharing some examples.


Which one is your favorite?


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH
Thursday at 08:45 PM
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Goddag Amalie,


Here are few examples of Danish interjection:


god aften

god eftermiddag

godaften

goddag

godmorgen

godnat


Mange Tak,


Farvel,

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH