Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Absolute Beginner, season 1, lesson 23, I’m So Glad It’s Friday in Denmark. I’m Gina.
Anna: Hej! And I’m Anna.
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to say “go to.”
Anna: There are several ways to say “go to” in Danish, so get ready to listen carefully.
Gina: Let’s get started!
Anna: The conversation takes place at a university and it’s between students Søren and Thomas, who are talking about what to do after class.
Gina: The speakers are friends, and they’re speaking standard Danish. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Søren: Tager du i universitetsbaren?
Thomas: Måske.
Søren: Jeg går derhen nu.
Thomas: Skal du i byen senere?
Søren: Selvfølgelig.
Gina: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Søren: Tager du i universitetsbaren?
Thomas: Måske.
Søren: Jeg går derhen nu.
Thomas: Skal du i byen senere?
Søren: Selvfølgelig.
Gina: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Søren: Tager du i universitetsbaren?
Gina: Are you going to the university bar?
Thomas: Måske.
Gina: Maybe.
Søren: Jeg går derhen nu.
Gina: I’m going over there now.
Thomas: Skal du i byen senere?
Gina: Are you going out later?
Søren: Selvfølgelig.
Gina: Of course.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Anna, what can you tell us about Danish university life?
Anna: Well, if you're starting at uni in Denmark, prepare yourself for the Introduction Week, or in Danish rusuge, which literally means “state of intoxication week.”
Gina: I assume this has got something to do with drinking?
Anna: Right. Your tutors will most likely have prepared some activities that involve drinking for when you’re not attending orientation meetings or tours.
Gina: And this is during the first week?
Anna: Yes. It’s a good way to get to know each other.
Gina: I can imagine.
Anna: When rusuge finishes, uni starts for real, but you can always go to one of the many Friday bars and blow off some steam and start gearing up for the weekend.
Gina: Sounds like fun! But for now… let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Gina: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Anna: tage i [natural native speed]
Gina: go to
Anna: tage i [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: tage i [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: universitetsbar [natural native speed]
Gina: university bar
Anna: universitetsbar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: universitetsbar [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: måske [natural native speed]
Gina: maybe, perhaps, possibly
Anna: måske [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: måske [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: jeg [natural native speed]
Gina: I
Anna: jeg [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: jeg [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: gå [natural native speed]
Gina: to go, to pass, to walk, to leave
Anna: gå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: gå [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: derhenne [natural native speed]
Gina: over there
Anna: derhenne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: derhenne [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: skulle [natural native speed]
Gina: have to, have got to, must, be meant to, be supposed to, should, ought to
Anna: skulle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: skulle [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: i byen [natural native speed]
Gina: in the town, in the city, out
Anna: i byen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: i byen [natural native speed]
Next:
Anna: senere [natural native speed]
Gina: later, afterwards
Anna: senere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: senere [natural native speed]
And Last:
Anna: selvfølgelig [natural native speed]
Gina: obvious, of course, naturally, certainly
Anna: selvfølgelig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: selvfølgelig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What’s first?
Anna: I byen. [pause] I byen.
Gina: This means “in the town” or “in the city” when you are talking about something that is literally in the town or the city.
Anna: Yes, for example, Der er mange mennesker i byen. [pause] Der er mange mennesker i byen.
Gina: This means “There are a lot of people in the city.”
Anna: Breaking this down, Der means “there,” er means “are,” mange means “a lot,” mennesker means “people,” and i byen means “in the city.”
Gina: Can you give us one more example?
Anna: Sure. De holder et karneval i byen. [pause] De holder et karneval i byen.
Gina: This means “They are holding a carnival in the city.”
Anna: De means “they,” holder means “are holding,” et means “a,” karneval means “carnival,” and i byen means “in the city.”
Gina: Great.
Anna: I byen can also mean “out” when it follows the verb gå, so it becomes gå i byen.
Gina: This means “go out,” as in go out in the city. What’s next?
Anna: Senere. [pause] Senere.
Gina: As an adjective this means “later”, and is used to describe nouns like in English.
Anna: That’s right. But as an adverb it can mean both “later” and “afterwards.”
Gina: Yes, and you can use it to say when something is happening later or after something else.
Anna: Exactly.
Gina: What’s next?
Anna: Selvfølgelig. [pause] Selvfølgelig.
Gina: As an adjective this means “obvious,” and it's used to describe nouns like the other word we just heard.
Anna: Yes, but as an adverb it means “of course,” “naturally,” and “certainly.”
Gina: Like in English, you can use it to express certainty.
Anna: That’s right.
Gina: Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to say “go to.”
Anna: In Danish, there is more than one way to say this.
Gina: In the dialogue, we heard three different ways of saying that you are going somewhere.
Anna: First, the phrase tage i was used. [pause] Tage i.
Gina: It's composed of a verb and a preposition.
Anna: Yes, the verb tage and the preposition i, which together mean “go to.”
Gina: In some cases, you use a different preposition, right?
Anna: Yes, sometimes you should use til instead of i, which also – together with tage – means “go to.”
Gina: Can you give us an example of its use?
Anna: Jeg tager til tandlægen. [pause] Jeg tager til tandlægen.
Gina: This means “I'm going to the dentist.”
Anna: Breaking this down, Jeg means “I,” tager til means “going to” or “am going to,” and tandlægen means “the dentist.”
Gina: So you can’t use the preposition i here?
Anna: No, because then the English translation would become “I'm going in the dentist,” which doesn’t make much sense.
Gina: Right. Another way of saying “go to” is…
Anna: By using the verb gå, which means “go” and is used in the same way as in English. Gå can either be followed by an adverb or a preposition.
Gina: Can you give us an example of each?
Anna: Sure. First followed by an adverb... Vi går hjem nu. [pause] Vi går hjem nu.
Gina: This means “We're going home now.”
Anna: Vi means “we,” går means “going” or “are going,” hjem is the adverb “home,” and nu means “now.”
Gina: And when the verb is followed by a preposition?
Anna: De går til stranden. [pause] De går til stranden.
Gina: This means “They're going to the beach.”
Anna: De means “they,” går means “going” or “are going,” til is the preposition “to,” and stranden means “the beach.”
Gina: Is there a rule of thumb when it comes to choosing between the prepositions i and til?
Anna: Unfortunately, no. But I can tell you that til is used before most proper names.
Gina: Great. What’s the last way of saying “go to”?
Anna: Like we learned in a previous lesson, you can use skal, which is the verb skulle in present tense, to express that you’re going somewhere in the future.
Gina: Right. Then you simply follow the verb with a preposition and then where you are going.
Anna: Exactly!

Outro

Gina: Okay, listeners, that’s all for now!
Anna: Check out the lesson notes for more examples and information!
Gina: Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time!
Anna: Vi ses!

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Hello listeners, how do you say "I'm not going anywhere" in Danish? Let's practice here!

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 07:57 PM
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Hej Jacob


Thank you for commenting.


"Anywhere" in Danish is "hvor som helst."

There are other ways, but this depends on the context.


Hope you will continue to enjoy learning Danish with us, and please let us know if you have any other questions.


Thank you!

Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

Jacob
Tuesday at 04:15 PM
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How do you say anywhere in Dansk?

Team DanishClass101.com
Monday at 08:15 PM
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Det var så lidt, Tarek!

Tarek
Saturday at 01:02 PM
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Tusind tak Gina og Anne alle sammen.