Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Absolute Beginner season 1, lesson 5, Dining Out in Denmark. I’m Gina.
Anna: Hej! And I’m Anna.
Gina: In this lesson we're going to teach you how to ask for something in Danish.
Anna: That’s right! Getting exactly what you want is much easier when you know how to ask for it.
Gina: So let’s get to it!
Anna: The conversation takes place at a restaurant and is between a waiter and a customer.
Gina: The speakers don’t know each other, but they are still speaking standard Danish.
DIALOGUE
Waiter: Velkommen til! Er du klar til at bestille?
Customer:Ja. Må jeg bede om dagens suppe?
Waiter: Ja, tak. Hvad kunne du tænke dig at drikke til?
Customer: Kan jeg få et glas vand?
Waiter: Ja selvfølgelig. Ellers andet?
Customer: Det var det hele. Tak.
Waiter: Welcome! Are you ready to order?
Customer: Yes. May I have the soup of the day?
Waiter: Yes. What would you like to drink with that?
Customer: Can I get a glass of water?
Waiter: Yes, of course. Anything else?
Customer: That's all. Thanks.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Let’s talk a little about the service levels in Denmark. Can we expect to be treated like kings and queens when dining out?
Anna: (laughs), perhaps if you ARE dining out with the Queen, or if you choose a really high-end restaurant.
Gina: I see. But isn’t that what people get paid for?
Anna: Well, it is, but many Danes working in the service industry tend to view their occupation as merely a job for making a living.
Gina: But they take pride in their work all the same, don’t they.
Anna: Yes, that’s right Gina.
Gina: So listeners, be sure to check out Denmark
Anna Yes, listeners, you should!
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Anna, what’s the first one?
Anna: Er du klar til at bestille?
Gina: This is one of the first things your waiter is going to ask you once you’ve had a good look at the menu.
Anna: Yes, because Er du klar til at bestille? means “Are you ready to order?”
Gina: But in case you're not dining alone in Denmark…
Anna: The pronoun du is replaced with I which is the second-person plural pronoun. It means “you” or perhaps rather “ye.” or “you all”
Gina: Great. What’s the next one?
Anna: Ellers andet.
Gina: Which means “Anything else.” This is the phrase your waiter, store clerk, or shop assistant is most likely going to ask you, once you seem to be done ordering or making a purchase.
Anna: Yes, but some may also use the phrases Er det det hele? or Var det det hele?
Gina: Right, these phrases literally mean “Is that it all?” or “Was that it all?”
Anna: But, as you’ve probably already guessed, they're equivalent to something like “Is that everything?” or “Was that all?”
Gina: Exactly. Next is...?
Anna: Det var det hele.
Gina: This phrase is basically the answer, if you’ve been asked Ellers andet? and you are done ordering, for example.
Anna: Yes, because Det var det hele means “That was all” or “That was all of it.”
Gina: Ok, do we have any more words or phrases?
Anna: No, det var det hele.
Gina: (laughs) Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for something.
Anna: We have several options to choose from, but you only need to know a couple of them.
Gina: One way of asking for something is...
Anna: Må jeg bede om (...)?, which means “May I have (...), please?”
Gina: The “please” at the end might give away that this is a polite way for Danes to ask for something.
Anna: Yes, and the verb må, which means “may,” “can,” or "must,” supports this too, because you are basically asking for permission to ask for something.
Gina: Can you tell us more about the composition of the sentence?
Anna: Sure. Jeg is the pronoun “I,” and bede om means “to ask for,” or more literally “to beg for,” adding even further politeness to the phrase.
Gina: Don’t mistake this for being formal Danish, because there are still no formality levels in spoken Danish.
Anna: No, using the phrase Må jeg bede om (...)? simply makes you sound more polite.
Gina: Another way of asking for something is…
Anna: Kan jeg få (...)? which means “Can I have (...)?” or “Can I get (...)?”
Gina: I think I’m starting to see a pattern here.
Anna: Yes, both Må jeg bede om (...)? and Kan jeg få (...)? have the same sentence structure.
Gina: I knew it!
Anna: Both start with a verb in present tense form and then a personal pronoun, followed by an infinitive verb.
Gina: So the only thing missing is the item or service you want to ask for, which you simply add at the end of the sentence, right?
Anna: Exactly!
Gina: Can you give us an example?
Anna: Sure. Må jeg bede om regningen?
Gina: Which means…“May I have the check, please?”
Anna: And with Kan jeg få (...)? Let’s say Kan jeg få regningen?
Gina: Which means “Can I have the check?” or “Can I get the check?”
Anna: Another great thing about Må jeg bede om (...)? and Kan jeg få (...)? is that you can easily use the words from the phrases interchangeably.
Gina: As long as you stick to the same sentence structure, right?
Anna: Right, just start with a verb in present tense form and then a personal pronoun, followed by an infinitive verb.
Gina: Okay, listeners, repeat the phrases again after Anna.
Anna: Må jeg bede om (...)?
Gina: And…
Anna: Kan jeg få (...)?

Outro

Gina: Ok, that’s all for this lesson! You’ll find more information on how to use the words from the phrases interchangeably in the lesson notes, so check them out. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time!
Anna: Hej hej!

12 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Listeners! Do you give tips in your country?

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 08:50 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Ali


Thank you for posting.


"Til" has several meanings depending on the context, because it can either be a preposition, an adverb, or a conjunction. In Danish, "til" is also used in many fixed phrases and expressions, such as those used in the dialogue, hence its multiple appearances.

For example, the first sentence, "Velkommen til!" is a fixed greeting meaning "Welcome!" The "til" basically indicates "to [place]." You can insert places like a restaurant or someone's home when someone arrives and you want to greet them.

Hope this cleared things up a little for you. Like in any language, it can be tough learning when to use certain prepositions and adverbs, as their translations and usages vary a lot.


Please let us know if you have any further questions.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

Ali
Saturday at 09:42 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi

I am new to danish , why does (til) means and why it is used many times in tis dialog?

Tak

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 04:48 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Camilla,


Thank you for commenting and sharing your personal experiences.


We do realize that customer service experiences vary from person to person, but in general, Danes themselves are not very impressed.


This is also why improving customer service always is one of the main focuses in every recent tourism strategy.

With that said, Denmark seems to be getting there slowly, and we are happy to hear you've only experienced good service. Let's hope this will become reality for everyone soon!


If you have any questions, please let us know.

Camilla
Wednesday at 04:56 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I don´t know why you guys are saying that customer service is not good in Denmark. It´s the best that I ever seen in all the countries I have been, and I have been in around 7 countries.


Everytime in to the supermarket the cashier say ''hi'' when you go pay , and when people are leaving they say; 'Have en god dag''. People answer back ''Tak, i lige måde ' .That is really sweet. I have seen other countries where the cashier just say ´´next´´, then efter you pay they just say ´´next´´ again, so the next person can hurry up.


Plus, everytime I¨m in te supermarket, if I need to find something and ask for help of an emplyee people are always nice and even stop what they are doing to try to find it with me.

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 09:47 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH


Thank you for your comment.


Jeg tror, alle her på DanishClass101.com kan lide is. ("I think everyone here at DanishClass101.com likes ice cream") :grin:


If you have any other questions, please let us know.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH
Wednesday at 10:22 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Godaften Amalie,


Undskyld, kan du lide is eller noget :)


Mnage Tak,

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH
Wednesday at 10:17 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Godaften Amalie,


kan du like is eller noget?


Mange Tak :)

SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 05:31 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej Sergiu Marian Leustean


Thank you for commenting.


Please be aware that it might be difficult to find a place in Denmark where you can order ice cream AND fruit at the same shop.


Also, when you want to say "some oranges" it is "nogle appelsiner."


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

Sergiu Marian Leustean
Saturday at 03:28 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej,


Kan jeg bede om en is og noget appelsiner, tak ?

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 08:34 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hej SANTHOSH SHIVARUDRAIAH


Thank you for your comment and for sharing.


In Denmark, you only give tips, or "drikkepenge" in Danish, if you REALLY want to show your appreciation at a restaurant or café.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Mange tak!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com