Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 22 - Asking for Permission in Danish
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 22 - Asking for Permission in Danish. Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for permission in Danish. The conversation takes place in the kitchen.
Anna: It's between Stine and Simone.
Eric: The speakers are family members. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Stine: Må jeg ikke få nogle penge til i morgen?
Simone: Hvad skal du bruge penge til?
Stine: Jeg skal til fest hos en veninde.
Simone: Har du fået lov til at tage til fest?
Stine: Ja, jeg har fået lov af far. Jeg spurgte om lov i går.
Simone: Nåh.
Stine: Ja, og må jeg så ikke nok låne nogle penge?
Simone: Jeg forstår ikke, hvad du skal bruge pengene til.
Stine: Vi bestiller pizzaer, som vi kan dele.
Simone: Så du spørger altså om lov til at få penge til øl.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Stine: Må jeg ikke få nogle penge til i morgen?
Simone: Hvad skal du bruge penge til?
Stine: Jeg skal til fest hos en veninde.
Simone: Har du fået lov til at tage til fest?
Stine: Ja, jeg har fået lov af far. Jeg spurgte om lov i går.
Simone: Nåh.
Stine: Ja, og må jeg så ikke nok låne nogle penge?
Simone: Jeg forstår ikke, hvad du skal bruge pengene til.
Stine: Vi bestiller pizzaer, som vi kan dele.
Simone: Så du spørger altså om lov til at få penge til øl.
Eric: Now, listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Stine: Må jeg ikke få nogle penge til i morgen?
Stine: Can't I have some money for tomorrow?
Simone: Hvad skal du bruge penge til?
Simone: What do you need money for?
Stine: Jeg skal til fest hos en veninde.
Stine: I’m going to a party at a friend's.
Simone: Har du fået lov til at tage til fest?
Simone: Are you allowed to go to the party?
Stine: Ja, jeg har fået lov af far. Jeg spurgte om lov i går.
Stine: Yes, dad gave me permission. I asked for permission yesterday.
Simone: Nåh.
Simone: I see.
Stine: Ja, og må jeg så ikke nok låne nogle penge?
Stine: Yes, so can't I please borrow some money then?
Simone: Jeg forstår ikke, hvad du skal bruge pengene til.
Simone: I don't understand what you need the money for.
Stine: Vi bestiller pizzaer, som vi kan dele.
Stine: We will order pizzas that we can share.
Simone: Så du spørger altså om lov til at få penge til øl.
Simone: So in other words, you’re asking for permission to get money for beer.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, how do young Danes like to spend their time?
Anna: First of all, they like spending time on social networking sites or using different apps.
Eric: Just like young people all over the world! What else do they like?
Anna: Well, when they’re not using apps, young Danes like to shop for the latest electronics, clothes, and other goods, either online or in actual stores, or go traveling. They say that nowadays the younger generation spends more money on dining out than ever before.
Eric: So basically, they aren’t worried about the economy and pension savings, right?
Anna: Yes. In general, young people have an endless number of options in all aspects of their lives, which has resulted in debates regarding the educational system. One trend is that many students try one course of study after another, but never complete any of them because they aren’t sure what they want to do with their lives.
Eric: That’s rough.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: at måtte [natural native speed]
Eric: may, can, must, to have to, to be bound to
Anna: at måtte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at måtte [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: ikke [natural native speed]
Eric: not, no
Anna: ikke [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ikke [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at få [natural native speed]
Eric: to get, to have
Anna: at få [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at få [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: lov [natural native speed]
Eric: law, permission
Anna: lov [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: lov [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: at spørge [natural native speed]
Eric: to ask
Anna: at spørge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at spørge [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: nåh [natural native speed]
Eric: I see
Anna: nåh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nåh [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: nok [natural native speed]
Eric: enough, probably, again, please, so, as much
Anna: nok [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nok [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have...
Anna: at forstå [natural native speed]
Eric: to understand
Anna: at forstå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at forstå [natural native speed]
ERIC:
Next we have...
Anna: som [natural native speed]
Eric: who, whom, which, that
Anna: som [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: som [natural native speed]
Eric: And last...
Anna: altså [natural native speed]
Eric: accordingly, in other words, really
Anna: altså [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: altså [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: nåh
Eric: This is an interjection that means “I see.” You can use it to express that you have understood what was explained, or that you have realized something.
Anna: We also use nåh to express scepticism about what was said.
Eric: Is there anyway to tell which meaning people are trying to express?
Anna: Yes, and this is important. When we’re using nåh to express understanding, we say it with a long rising tone. Listen carefully - nåh. And when we use nåh to express scepticism, we say it with a long but flat intonation. Note the different intonation - nåh.
Eric: That’s good to know. Anna, can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Han løb virkelig hele vejen. Nåh...
Eric: ...which means “He really did run all the way.” “I see…” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: som
Eric: which means “who,” “whom,” “which,” or “that.” It’s often used to state a relative clause, where it refers to a person, an object, or a place in the main clause.
Anna: Som can also be used after other words you use to start a relative clause, such as - og
Eric: meaning "and"
Anna: men
Eric: "but,"
Anna: eller
Eric: meaning "or"
Anna: There’s another pronoun, der, that can be used interchangeably in relative clauses because it has the same meaning as som.
Eric: So it can be used in exactly the same way?
Anna: The main difference is that, when referring to something in the main clause, der can not be used after og, men, or eller.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Anna: For example, you can say.. Der er ingen, som forstår mig.
Eric: .. which means “There’s no one who understands me.” Okay, what's the last word?
Anna: altså
Eric: which means “accordingly,” “in other words,” or “really.”
Anna: The adverb altså is made up of the adverbs alt and så. Alt means “all” and så means “so.”
Eric: You can use it before giving a logical result, cause, elaboration, specification, or correction of what was said, like the English “therefore.”
Anna: Altså can also be used when coming to a conclusion or making an assumption, a little like the English “so.”
Eric: Let’s have an example using this word.
Anna: You can say.. Altså, du må også gerne blive her.
Eric: .. which means “So, you may also stay here.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for permission in Danish.
Anna: To do this, you can use the phrase at få lov,
Eric: which means “to be allowed.”
Anna: at få lov consists of the verb at få - “to get” and the common gender noun lov, meaning “law,” or “permission.”
Eric: You can use this phrase when you’re asking or giving someone permission to do something. The basic pattern to form questions with this phrase is -
Anna: modal verb, plus subject, plus at få lov, plus til, plus at, plus the verb in infinitive form.
Eric: If you use this phrase as an answer, the sentence stays the same except for the subject which now goes first, before the modal verb. Let’s listen to an example -
Anna: Kan jeg få lov til at ringe?
Eric: Literally this is “Can I be allowed to call?” And the answer will be…
Anna: Ja, du kan få lov til at ringe.
Eric: “Yes, you can be allowed to call.”
Anna: You can also answer without the modal verbs. In this case, you can put få in present tense so it becomes får. As in Ja, du får lov til at ringe.
Eric: “Yes, you are allowed to call.” Ok, here’s another example, this time in negative form - not giving permission to do something.
Anna: Må jeg få lov til at sælge maleriet?
Eric: “May I be allowed to sell the painting?”
Anna: Nej, du må ikke få lov til at sælge maleriet.
Eric: “No, you may not be allowed to sell the painting.”
Anna: Or, you can also say...Nej, du får ikke lov til at sælge maleriet.
Eric: “No, you are not allowed to sell the painting.” Another common phrase that you can use to ask for permission is -
Anna: at spørge om lov
Eric: which means “to ask for permission.”
Anna: at spørge om lov is made of the verb at spørge which means “to ask,” the preposition om, meaning “for,” and the common gender noun lov, meaning “permission,” or “law.”
Eric: You can use this phrase to ask someone for permission to do something indirectly. To form questions or answers, use the same pattern as the previous expression.
Anna: Just change the phrase.
Eric: Here are some examples.
Anna: Jeg vil gerne spørge om lov til at gå.
Eric: “I would like to ask permission to leave.”
Anna: Han spurgte om lov til at bygge et hegn.
Eric: “He asked for permission to build a fence.”
Anna: Har du spurgt om lov?
Eric: “Have you asked for permission?”
Anna: Okay, now before we go, I would like to introduce a very useful adverb - nok.
Eric: meaning “enough,” “well,” or “too much.”
Anna: You can use this adverb to indicate blame, irony, sarcasm, or regret.
Eric: Or to express wonder about what is being said.
Anna: Listeners, remember that you can find more information and examples in the Lesson Notes.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Anna: Vi ses!

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