Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 3 - How Do You Get a Date with a Danish Person?
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 3 - How Do You Get a Date with a Danish Person? Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn about modal verbs and Danish imperative forms. The conversation takes place at a pool party.
Anna: It's between Marcus and Thor.
Eric: The speakers are friends. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Markus: Jeg tror, jeg går hen og skubber Lisa i poolen.
Thor: Gør det ikke. Hun bliver bare sur.
Markus: Okay, så sprøjter jeg vand på hende!
Thor: Nej, du burde slet ikke gøre noget, der kan gøre hende sur på dig.
Markus: Jamen, hvordan kommer jeg så i kontakt med hende?
Thor: Du skulle måske starte med at sige hej til hende.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Markus: Jeg tror, jeg går hen og skubber Lisa i poolen.
Thor: Gør det ikke. Hun bliver bare sur.
Markus: Okay, så sprøjter jeg vand på hende!
Thor: Nej, du burde slet ikke gøre noget, der kan gøre hende sur på dig.
Markus: Jamen, hvordan kommer jeg så i kontakt med hende?
Thor: Du skulle måske starte med at sige hej til hende.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Markus: Jeg tror, jeg går hen og skubber Lisa i poolen.
Marcus: I think I’ll go and push Lisa in the pool.
Thor: Gør det ikke. Hun bliver bare sur.
Thor: Don't do it. She'll just get mad.
Markus: Okay, så sprøjter jeg vand på hende!
Marcus: Okay, then I’ll spray water on her!
Thor: Nej, du burde slet ikke gøre noget, der kan gøre hende sur på dig.
Thor: No, you shouldn’t do anything at all that could make her mad at you.
Markus: Jamen, hvordan kommer jeg så i kontakt med hende?
Marcus: But then how do I get in contact with her?
Thor: Du skulle måske starte med at sige hej til hende.
Thor: Maybe you should start with saying hi to her?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, how do Danes usually show their interest in someone?
Anna: Many Danes show their interest in someone by maintaining eye contact longer than the comfortable period of time, or by smiling to appear more approachable.
Eric: And these are common flirting tactics?
Anna: Yes. However, these flirting indicators can lead to misunderstandings, because keeping eye contact and smiling could simply be indicators of politeness as opposed to actual flirtation techniques.
Eric: I’ve heard that Danish guys tend to be worse than Danish girls at picking someone up by flirting with them.
Anna: I’d have to agree. It’s because when Danish men flirt it’s usually done subtly, which can be hard to pick up on. There isn’t much obvious or transparent flirting done by Danish men.
Eric: That’s interesting! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: at skubbe [natural native speed]
Eric: to push
Anna: at skubbe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at skubbe [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at gøre [natural native speed]
Eric: to do, to make
Anna: at gøre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at gøre [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: ikke [natural native speed]
Eric: not
Anna: ikke [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: ikke [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: sur [natural native speed]
Eric: mad, angry, sour
Anna: sur [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: sur [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at sprøjte [natural native speed]
Eric: to spray, to squirt, to spurt
Anna: at sprøjte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at sprøjte [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at burde [natural native speed]
Eric: ought to, should
Anna: at burde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at burde [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: slet [natural native speed]
Eric: not, no
Anna: slet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: slet [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: jamen [natural native speed]
Eric: but
Anna: jamen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: jamen [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at skulle [natural native speed]
Eric: to have to, have got to, must, ought to, should
Anna: at skulle [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at skulle [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: at sige [natural native speed]
Eric: to say, to tell
Anna: at sige [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at sige [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: sur
Eric: It’s an adjective that has several meanings depending on the context. It most often means “mad,” “angry,” or “sour.”
Anna: You can use sur the same way in Danish as you would in English.
Eric: You can use it to describe acidic food or beverages, as well as to describe someone's mood.
Anna: Right. However, if someone is really angry or mad, you can use the adjective vred instead, which means “angry” or “mad.” Even though sur and vred can mean the same thing, you can use vred to emphasize the degree of someone's anger. Sur….
Eric: can also mean “grumpy,” while
Anna: vred
Eric: only means “angry” or “mad.” Anna, can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. De er sure på ham.
Eric: ..which means “They are mad at him.” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: slet
Eric: which means “not,” or “no.”
Anna: As an adverb, slet is used in negative constructions together with the adverb ikke, which means “not” or “no,” or with pronouns to emphasize the negation. For example, slet ikke is the equivalent of “not at all.”
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Tøjet er slet ikke mig.
Eric: .. which means “These clothes are not me at all.” Okay, what's the last word?
Anna: jamen
Eric: which means “but.”
Anna: Ja is an interjection and means “yes.” Men is a conjunction and means “but.”
Eric: In general, this word is used when expressing a contradiction or a protest related to the preceding statement. For example, when expressing a slightly reluctant confession or hesitantly giving permission.
Anna: Another example is when expressing a personal feeling, such as surprise or excitement. In this case, jamen is used as an exclamation that brings more life to your speech.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Jamen, så får du ikke dessert.
Eric: .. which means “But then you will not get dessert.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about modal verbs and the imperative form in Danish.
Anna: A modal verb is a type of auxiliary verb used to show modality.
Eric: That is, that we believe something is or is not certain, probable or possible. In other words, it is used to indicate likelihood, ability, permission, and obligation.
Anna: In this lesson’s dialogue, we used the modal verbs at kunne and at skulle.
Eric: We talked about...
Anna: at kunne
Eric: in the first lesson of this series. This time we will focus on
Anna: at skulle
Eric: Meaning “have to,” or “must.”
Anna: This modal verb is used to express orders and commands.
Eric: Another usage is for expressing moral obligation or correctness, for example, when someone ought to do something.
Anna: At skulle is also used for stating a future condition or circumstance in connection with a promise, insurance, prediction, or threat.
Eric: When in past tense, it can be used to state that something is thought, possible, or is in another way hypothetical.
Anna: The modal verb is not conjugated according to person, only tense.
Eric: So the infinitive is…
Anna: skulle
Eric: the present tense is…
Anna: skal
Eric: the past tense...
Anna: skulle
Eric: and the participle is..
Anna: skullet
Eric: Alright, Anna, can you give us some examples using this word?
Anna: Sure, Jeg skal gøre rent på mit værelse.
Eric: “I have to clean my room.”
Anna: Here, at skulle is used to indicate that someone is forced to clean their room by external circumstances.
Eric: Let’s have another example.
Anna: Du skulle skamme dig.
Eric: “You should be ashamed of yourself.”
Anna: Here, at skulle is clearly used to indicate moral obligation or correctness.
Eric: Another example with this modal verb is...
Anna: Vi skal mødes i morgen.
Eric: This literally means “We shall meet tomorrow.”
Anna: In this sentence, “at skulle” is used to indicate that something is planned or intended.
Eric: And the last sample sentence is…
Anna: Det skal nok blive bedre.
Eric: This literally means “It shall probably become better,” but is equivalent to “It will get better.”
Anna: In this example, at skulle is used to state a promise.
Eric: Great! The second grammar point of this lesson is the imperative mood. To give orders, commands, or requests, as well as prohibition or permission, you can use the word...
Anna: gøre
Eric: meaning “to do” or ”to make” in its affirmative imperative form, which is
Anna: gør.
Eric: For example, you can say…
Anna: Gør som jeg siger!
Eric: Meaning “Do as I say!” Another useful example is...
Anna: Gør det nu bare!
Eric: This literally means “Do it now just!” and is the equivalent of “Just do it already!” or “Just do it!” Another useful example is...
Anna: Gør det igen!
Eric: Meaning “Do it again!”
Anna: Just as you would use the verb at gøre in the affirmative imperative form, you would also put gør at the very beginning of the sentence when you’re using it as a negated imperative together with the adverb ikke.
Eric: This is used to negate sentences and means “no” or “not.” For example..
Anna: Gør det ikke.
Eric: “Do not do it.”
Anna: Gør ikke mere ud af det.
Eric: “Do not make more out of it.” Listeners, don’t forget that you can find more examples and explanations in the lesson notes.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Vi ses!

10 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi Listeners! Try making a simple sentence with the adjective "sur."

Luca P. Gentile
Thursday at 03:12 AM
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Hvis jeg kan ikke dansen, jeg bliv sur som sour cream.

DanishClass101.com
Sunday at 11:25 PM
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Hello Barros,


Thank you for posting.


Please let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team DanishClass101.com


Barros
Tuesday at 11:09 AM
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Hej


Jeg bliver sur, når jeg studerer ikke dansk. :)


tak.

DanishClass101.com
Tuesday at 01:21 AM
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Hi Monique,


Thank you for leaving the comment.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team DanishClass101.com

Monique
Sunday at 10:06 PM
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Hej!


Jeg blive sur, når nogen er uhøfligt.


Tak,

Monique

DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 09:13 PM
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Hej Alba.


Thanks for posting.


The word "slet" makes a slight difference, although it can be left out. The difference is equvalent to "You shouldn't do anything" and "You shouldn't do anything at all".


Have a nice day ahead.


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Alba
Friday at 06:03 PM
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Hej!


At lære dansk gøre mig sur!


Jeg har en spørgsmål: in the sentance “Du burde slet ikke gøre noget”, is the word “slet” necessary? Or the meaning of the sentance is also correct without “slet”: “Du burde ikke gøre noget”.


Godt nyttår til alle!


Tak!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:20 PM
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Hello Olga,


Thank you for your question.

After you chose 'Study' the flashcard, you'll hear the audio only.

Then by clicking 'Show answer' you can see how the word is written and it's meaning.

If you guessed right, you choose correct, if not then the incorrect button.

Basically it's a comprehension check for you to see how many words you could memorize so far.


If you want to practice more, please check the Review section for quizzes.

Let us know if you have any further questions.

Cheers,

Lena

Team DanishClass101.com

olga
Monday at 11:43 PM
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Hi , how does vocabulary flashcards works ? When i start Flashcards Session it shows the word and "show answer " button., then it shows the word , sentence and correct and incorrect bottns. What is the challenge ?