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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 6 - What Are Your Plans for the Danish Future?
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Beginner Season 1 Lesson 6. What Are Your Plans for the Danish Future? Eric here.
Anna: Hej! I'm Anna.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to form the future tense in Danish. The conversation takes place at an office entrance.
Anna: It's between Simone and Oliver.
Eric: The speakers are an employer and employee. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Simone: Nå, hvad skal I så i ferien?
Oliver: Jeg holder ikke ferie i næste uge, men i weekenden skal jeg i sommerhus med børnene.
Simone: Så du arbejder næste uge?
Oliver: Ja.
Simone: Ja, min mand og jeg rejser til Malaga allerede på lørdag.
Oliver: Næste weekend holder jeg fødselsdagsfest for min datter. Hun bliver syv år.
Simone: Tillykke med hende!
Oliver: Mange tak.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Simone: Nå, hvad skal I så i ferien?
Oliver: Jeg holder ikke ferie i næste uge, men i weekenden skal jeg i sommerhus med børnene.
Simone: Så du arbejder næste uge?
Oliver: Ja.
Simone: Ja, min mand og jeg rejser til Malaga allerede på lørdag.
Oliver: Næste weekend holder jeg fødselsdagsfest for min datter. Hun bliver syv år.
Simone: Tillykke med hende!
Oliver: Mange tak.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Simone: Nå, hvad skal I så i ferien?
Simone: So, what are you going to do during the vacation?
Oliver: Jeg holder ikke ferie i næste uge, men i weekenden skal jeg i sommerhus med børnene.
Oliver: I’m not on vacation next week, but on the weekend I’m going to the summer house with the kids.
Simone: Så du arbejder næste uge?
Simone: So you’re working next week?
Oliver: Ja.
Oliver: Yes.
Simone: Ja, min mand og jeg rejser til Malaga allerede på lørdag.
Simone: Well, my husband and I are going to Malaga on Saturday.
Oliver: Næste weekend holder jeg fødselsdagsfest for min datter. Hun bliver syv år.
Oliver: Next weekend I’m having a birthday party for my daughter. She turns 7.
Simone: Tillykke med hende!
Simone: Happy birthday to her!
Oliver: Mange tak.
Oliver: Thank you very much.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Anna, where do Danish families usually go on holidays?
Anna: If they’re not staying in Denmark, many Danish families go on package holidays during the summer to destinations near the Mediterranean, like Spain, Greece, or Turkey.
Eric: And what about for winter vacations?
Anna: In the winter, many people go skiing in Norway, France, or Switzerland. For some families, it’s also a tradition to go on a trip to Thailand for Christmas instead of spending money on presents.
Eric: That sounds like a great tradition. So, as far as I understand, in general it’s popular to go on trips to major European cities.
Anna: Right. Recently, though, it's become popular to travel to more distant countries as well, such as the United States, Indonesia, and Japan. This is mainly because there are now better flight connections and easier route possibilities than there were in the past.
Eric: I see! Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: nå [natural native speed]
Eric: so, oh, well, I see
Anna: nå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: nå [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: ferie [natural native speed]
Eric: vacation, holiday
Anna: ferie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Eric: ferie [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at holde ferie [natural native speed]
Eric: to take a vacation or holiday
Anna: at holde ferie [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Eric: at holde ferie [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: næste uge [natural native speed]
Eric: next week
Anna: næste uge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: næste uge [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: weekend [natural native speed]
Eric: weekend
Anna: weekend [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: weekend [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: sommerhus [natural native speed]
Eric: summer house, cottage
Anna: sommerhus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: sommerhus [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: at rejse [natural native speed]
Eric: to travel, to go, to leave
Anna: at rejse [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: at rejse [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: allerede [natural native speed]
Eric: already
Anna: allerede [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: allerede [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Anna: datter [natural native speed]
Eric: daughter
Anna: datter [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: datter [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Anna: tilbage [natural native speed]
Eric: back, backwards, left
Anna: tilbage [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Anna: tilbage [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Anna: nå
Eric: It’s an interjection that has several meanings. It can mean “so,” “oh,” “well,” or “I see,” depending on the context.
Anna: Nå is often used as a matter-of-fact declaratory answer to something that has been said.
Eric: In some cases it can be used as a disinterested or slightly rejecting answer to something that has been said.
Anna: In other cases, however, nå can be used to express the exact opposite, showing that you are following the conversation with interest and understand what is being said.
Eric: It is used just like you would use “right” or “oh, I see” in English.
Anna: You can also use it to begin a statement if you want to summarize or end a conversation, or simply change the subject.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Nå, nu skal vi have is!
Eric: Meaning “Well, now we are going to have ice cream!” Okay, what's the next word?
Anna: tilbage
Eric: which means “back,” “backwards,” or “left.”
Anna: Tilbage is mostly used like the English “back” to indicate a place where someone or something comes from or has been before.
Eric: It can also refer to an earlier condition or previous occupation or position in relation to something being resumed, or someone becoming active again.
Anna: Tilbage can also indicate direction, or more precisely, backward movement, as well as a specific time or period in the past..
Eric: You can also use it when something has been returned to someplace or someone. It is the equivalent of the English “returned.” Can you give us an example using this word?
Anna: Sure. For example, you can say.. Hvornår kommer du tilbage?
Eric: “When are you coming back?” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the future tense in Danish.
Anna: In Danish, there are two ways of forming the future tense.
Eric: You can use the modal verb
Anna: skulle,
Eric: which is equivalent to “be going to,” plus a verb in infinitive form, or the modal verb
Anna: ville,
Eric: meaning “will,” plus a verb in infinitive form. Can you give us an example?
Anna: Sure. Let's take the verb at ske meaning “to happen.” skal ske means “is going to happen” and vil ske means “will happen.”
Eric: Let’s hear another example, this time with the verb “to rain” -
Anna: In Danish, “to rain” is at regne. So, “is going to rain” will be skal regne and “will rain” is vil regne
Eric: Great! Let’s have one last example, using the verb “to travel.”
Anna: “To travel” is at rejse. Skal rejse means “is going to travel” and vil rejse means “will travel.”
Eric: I think it's clear now.
Anna: Good! Now there’s one more way to form the future tense in Danish that we should cover, which is using the present tense to talk about the future.
Eric: Can you give us an example?
Anna: Sure, Udvekslingen sker ved solnedgang.
Eric: “The exchange happens at sunset.”
Anna: As you can see, the verb is in the present tense - sker, meaning “happens.”
Eric: Note how even though the verb is in present tense, it’s clear that it indicates the future tense because of the time expression...
Anna: ved solnedgang
Eric: “at sunset.” This makes it clear that the event has not happened yet, but that it will happen later at sunset. Let’s give the listeners another example, using a verb in present tense to indicate future tense.
Anna: Sure. Solen skinner i weekenden.
Eric: This literally means “the sun is shining on the weekend,” but can be interpreted as “the sun is going to shine on the weekend.”
Anna: Exactly. Skinner is the verb at skinne, meaning “to shine,” in present tense.
Eric: But since we have the phrase -
Anna: i weekenden
Eric: meaning “on the weekend,” we can infer that the sentence is talking about the coming weekend, indicating future tense.
Anna: That’s right. Now let’s use the modal verbs we just learned.
Eric: Using “going to,” we have
Anna: Solen skal skinne i weekenden.
Eric: “The sun is going to shine on the weekend.”
Anna: Pay attention to the verb skal skinne, and note that it’s made up of the modal verb skulle conjugated in the present tense - skal. Plus, the verb “shine” in infinitive form - skinne.
Eric: Now let’s use “will.”
Anna: Solen vil skinne i weekenden.
Eric: “The sun will shine on the weekend.”
Anna: Here we have vil skinne. Vil comes from the verb ville conjugated in present tense, and again the verb “shine” is in the infinitive form, skinne.
Eric: Listeners, make sure to check out the lesson notes for a word by word explanation of each sentence, and more examples.
Anna: Right, and remember that when you’re using a modal verb to form the future tense, the main verb must be in the infinitive form.
Eric: In this lesson, we've learned three ways to form the future tense in Danish. Anna, can you give us some tips to help us decide which modal verb to use?
Anna: No problem! If you’re not sure whether you should use “going to” or “will,” remember that skulle implies obligation, while ville implies prediction regarding future events or actions.
Eric: Great, and remember you can also use the present tense and follow up with a time expression, to talk about a future event.
Anna: That’s right. In the lesson notes you can find a chart with common Danish time expressions, so be sure to check them out.
Eric: Before we wrap up, can you give us a couple examples of time expressions that can be used to indicate the future?
Anna: Okay, we could say om eftermiddagen
Eric: “in the afternoon”
Anna: Or we could simply say senere.
Eric: Meaning “later.” Alright, Anna, before we leave, can you tell us what your favorite topic is for talking about future tense?
Anna: Well, I love traveling, so that would have to be talking about my upcoming trips!
Eric: I’m with you on that one! Listeners, if you also enjoy sharing your vacation or business trip plans with others, have a look at the third point of this lesson’s lesson notes.
Anna: We’ve included a conjugation chart and sample sentences using the verb rejse,
Eric: meaning “to travel”, “to go,” or “to leave,” so be sure to check it out!

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Anna: Ses!

12 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Where will you go on your next holidays?

Braden
Tuesday at 02:18 PM
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Min kæreste og jeg resjer syd næste ferie. Vi bor i Vest Australien så rejser vi til Denmark, Vest Australien, om sommeren 😄


Vi håber at returnerer til Danmark næste år at se sine familier.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:00 PM
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Hi Luca.


Thank you for your questions.


Right, "Vi kan ikke tage på ferie i denne corona-tid."


Yes, it could mine as well be "du", but then the question would only be posed to one person instead of multiple with "I".


In past tense, it would be "Solen skinnede i weekenden".


Keep it rolling.


Cheers


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Luca P. Gentile
Monday at 02:04 AM
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Vi kunne ikke have ferie, i denne corona time




¨Nå, hvad skal I så i ferien?¨

Hvorfor ¨I¨ og ikke ¨du¨?


¨Solen skinner i weekenden¨

Could this not refer to the past too?

DanishClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:25 PM
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Hi Susanne Magazeno.


Thanks for posting.


I guess that's a bit problematic. I think it's possible to set the keyboard to Danish and have those letters on other keys.


Good luck!


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com


Susanne Magazeno
Sunday at 07:13 AM
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I have an english keyboard which does not have ae, oe, aa so it marks it wrong

DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 08:12 PM
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Hi Dustin.


The sentence is correct, apart from "skal rejser" which is supposed to be "skal rejse".


It would sound more natural, though, if you left out one of those words as in:


"Min kone og jeg skal til København og Langeland på vores næste ferie i December."

or

"Min kone og jeg rejser til København og Langeland på vores næste ferie i December."


Keep up the good work.


Kind regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101


DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 08:27 AM
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Hi Dustin.


Thank you for your question.


In that context, "Allerede" works in the same way as "already". "Already on Saturday my husband and I are traveling to Malaga." So it's about stressing the fact that something is going to happen soon.


Let us know if you have any further questions.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101



Dustin
Friday at 06:59 AM
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Min kone og jeg skal rejser til København og Langeland på vores næste ferie i December.

Dustin
Thursday at 11:20 AM
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Hi,


Why do they use the word allerede (already) in a sentence about the future?


Ja, min mand og jeg rejser til Malaga allerede på lørdag.


Thanks


DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:57 AM
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Hi Sebastien.


Cool choice. Hope you enjoy it. Thanks for commenting.


Linda

Team DanishClasses101.com