Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 15 - Making Your Way to a Danish Festival. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to discuss past events and regrets. The conversation takes place at the station.
Nana: It's between Johan and Mia.
John: The speakers are family members. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mia: Skynd dig! Toget holder der allerede.
Johan: Vi havde ikke behøvet at løbe, hvis vi var blevet kørt herhen.
Mia: Havde vi fået nogen til at køre os, havde vi ikke behøvet at tage bussen.
Johan: Ja, bare NOGEN havde husket at spørge mor i god tid.
Mia: Ja ja, jeg ved det godt. Hmm, der er mange, som kun har skuldertasker og rygsække med.
Johan: Jeg ville ønske, at jeg havde taget imod Sofias tilbud om at tage dit telt med også.
Mia: Jeg vidste ikke, at Sofia allerede var taget derhen.
Johan: Jeg er dog glad for, vi ikke tog med hende og de andre, fordi det havde regnet den første nat.
Mia: Gid jeg havde vidst det! Så havde jeg byttet min vagt. Og taget en paraply med.
Johan: Du havde så også været tvunget til at slæbe rundt på dit eget telt. Det vejer godt til!
Mia: Jeg skal nok belønne dig med en burger på festivalen. Hvis du ikke havde båret det, var vi aldrig nået herhen.
Johan: Øh, der kører toget...!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Mia: Hurry up! The train is already there.
Johan: We wouldn’t have had to run, if we’d been driven here.
Mia: Had we gotten someone to drive us, we wouldn’t have had to take the bus.
Johan: Yes, if only SOMEONE had remembered to ask mom in time.
Mia: Yeah yeah, I know. Hmm, there are many people who are only bringing shoulder bags and backpacks.
Johan: I wish that I had taken Sophia's offer of taking your tent along too.
Mia: I didn't know that Sophia had already gone there.
Johan: I'm glad, though, that we didn't go with her and the others, because it rained the first night.
Mia: I wish I had known! Then I would have traded my shift. And brought an umbrella.
Johan: You would have also been forced to carry around your own tent then. It’s quite heavy!
Mia: I'll reward you with a burger at the festival. If you hadn’t carried it, we would never have managed to get here.
Johan: Uhm, there goes the train...!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Mia and Johan are going to a festival, and seem to be having an adventure already.
Nana: But maybe not as much of an adventure as Sophia and the other people there.
John: Rain at festivals is the worst, especially when you’re camping.
Nana: It’s not fun, is it? In the summer in Denmark there are many festivals.
John: What are they like?
Nana: Small towns have festivals with live music, food, and dancing.
John: Do larger cities have festivals too?
Nana: Yes, they sometimes have music festivals that feature local and international artists.
John: Music festivals are my favorite festivals.
Nana: Really? I love Middle Ages themed festivals and ringridning.
John: What is that?
Nana: It’s a sport on horseback, where you pierce a ring with a lance.
John: Oh, so it’s like jousting only with rings? Cool. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: skynde sig [natural native speed]
John: to hurry, to hurry up, to hasten, to be quick
Nana: skynde sig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: skynde sig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: nogen [natural native speed]
John: some, any, somebody, anybody
Nana: nogen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nogen [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: i god tid [natural native speed]
John: in good time
Nana: i god tid [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: i god tid [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: imod [natural native speed]
John: against
Nana: imod [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: imod [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: glad [natural native speed]
John: happy, glad, pleased
Nana: glad [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: glad [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: tvinge [natural native speed]
John: to force, to compel
Nana: tvinge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tvinge [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: slæbe [natural native speed]
John: to haul, to drag
Nana: slæbe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: slæbe [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: veje [natural native speed]
John: to weigh
Nana: veje [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: veje [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: belønne [natural native speed]
John: to reward
Nana: belønne [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: belønne [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: nå [natural native speed]
John: to reach, to be in time for, to have time to, to manage to
Nana: nå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nå [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: tage imod
John: meaning "to receive, to accept." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: First is the irregular verb tage,
John: which means "to take,"
Nana: and then the preposition imod, which means "toward.”
John: If we take that literally, it doesn’t make much sense...
Nana: No, it doesn’t. Just remember it as being similar to the English “to receive,” or “to accept.”
John: Okay, so we use it when we’re accepting something?
Nana: Yes, like an offer or a suggestion.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, De tog imod pengene alligevel.
John: ...which means "They accepted the money anyway."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: være glad for
John: Meaning "to be glad that." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: The phrase consists of the irregular verb være
John: which means "to be,"
Nana: the adjective glad,
John: which means "glad,"
Nana: and finally the preposition for, which most commonly means "for."
John: In this case, that preposition is used to show that we are happy about something.
Nana: Yes, you use this phrase when you’re happy that something has happened, or will happen.
John: Is that always the case?
Nana: When the phrase is followed by an object, its meaning changes to "to like."
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Hun er glad for, de kan følges.
John: ...which means "She is glad they can go together."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: veje til
John: Meaning "to be heavy." Can you break this expression down for us?
Nana: The phrase consists of the regular verb veje,
John: which means "to weigh,"
Nana: and the preposition til, which means "to."
John: So we can use this to describe the weight of someone or something.
Nana: Yes, but like with many other languages, be careful if you’re talking about the weight of a person!
John: Of course! It’s usually best to avoid that discussion altogether.
Nana: I think so too!
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Din kuffert vejer godt til.
John: ...which means "Your suitcase is quite heavy." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to discuss past events and regrets.
John: To do this, I guess we’ll need to use the past tense, right?
Nana: Right. We’ve talked about the past perfect tense in previous lessons. And, we’ve used the auxiliary verbs have and være.
John: What’s the difference between the two?
Nana: Have is more commonly used. It’s used when the action itself is the focus.
John: And the other auxiliary verb?
Nana: Være, which means “to be,” is used with verbs which describe a change or physical movement of some kind, as in from one place to another.
John: In both cases, the auxiliary verb is conjugated in past tense and followed by the past participle of another verb.
Nana: You form the past participle by adding -et or just -t to the base or imperative form of a verb.
John: You can also use the past perfect tense when imagining if a past event had gone differently.
Nana: In this case, it's often used with the conditional hvis, which means “if.”
John: Let’s look at some examples.
Nana: De vidste ikke, at hun allerede var taget afsted.
John: “They did not know that she had already left.”
Nana: Vi havde nået det, hvis vi var løbet.
John: “We would have made it, if we had run.” How do we say that we wish things had been different in the past?
Nana: You use the modal verb ville,
John: which means “to will,”
Nana: and the regular verb ønske, which means “to wish.”
John: An example, please?
Nana: Pigen ville ønske, at han var taget med.
John: “The girl wishes that he had come along.”
Nana: You can also use the adverbs bare and gid for this. Bare usually means “just” or “only...”
John: ...but when used in this context, it means “I wish.” These adverbs are placed at the very beginning of a sentence in the past perfect tense.
Nana: For example, Bare jeg havde pakket mine gummistøvler.
John: “I wish I had packed my rubber boots.”
Nana: Or Gid toget havde været forsinket for en gangs skyld.
John: “I wish the train had been late for once.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

2 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Which is your favorite Danish festival?

Roger
Sunday at 04:25 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Jeg har ingen favorit, fordi jeg aldrig har været til en dansk festival.