Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 16 - Closing a Bank Account in Denmark. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the right compound at the right time. The conversation takes place at the bank.
Nana: It's between Helle and Theresa.
John: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Helle: Goddag. Hvad kan jeg gøre for dig?
Theresa: Hej. Jeg åbnede en konto her i banken sidste år, men nu vil jeg gerne lukke den.
Helle: Okay. Må jeg spørge af hvilken grund?
Theresa: Jeg har ikke brug for min konto mere, da min mand og jeg ønsker en fælles konto.
Helle: Er din mand også kunde her i banken?
Theresa: Nej, det er han ikke.
Helle: Hvis I har lyst, kan jeg henvise jer til en rådgiver. Vi kan måske tilbyde jer en bedre rente.
Theresa: Min mand er bortrejst i øjeblikket, men jeg tror ikke, det bliver nødvendigt.
Helle: Han er vel ikke rejst bort for evigt? Du har ingen gæld, så I vil kunne indgå en god aftale.
Theresa: Nej, det er han forhåbentlig ikke. Men vi har taget beslutningen.
Helle: Okay. Vil du have udbetalt din saldo, eller har du et kontonummer, jeg skal overføre til?
Theresa: Der blev indbetalt nogle penge i mandags. Dem vil jeg gerne have udbetalt. Overfør resten.
Helle: Det er forstået. Det er altid godt at have lidt ekstra til sig selv.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Helle: Hello. What can I do for you?
Theresa: Hello. I opened an account at this bank last year, but now I would like to close it.
Helle: Alright. May I ask for what reason?
Theresa: I don't need my account anymore, since my husband and I want a joint account.
Helle: Is your husband also a customer of this bank?
Theresa: No, he’s not.
Helle: If you'd like, I can refer you to a consultant. We might be able to offer you a better interest rate.
Theresa: My husband is out of town at the moment, but I don't think it will be necessary.
Helle: He won't be away forever, will he? You don't have any debt so you'll be able to get a good deal.
Theresa: No, hopefully he isn't. But we’ve made the decision.
Helle: Alright. Do you want your balance paid out, or do you have an account number that I should transfer it to?
Theresa: Some money was paid into it last Monday. I would like to have that paid out. Transfer the rest.
Helle: Got it. It's always good to have a little extra for yourself.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: In this conversation, we were at the bank. I hate going to the bank.
Nana: Me too, but this seemed easy, don’t you think?
John: Yes it did, but we don’t know how long Theresa had to wait for her appointment!
Nana: Ah, true. She was there for an important reason though - to close her account so she could have a joint account.
John: Is it common for couples to have a joint account?
Nana: Yes, in fact deleøkonomi is becoming common in many more ways, especially in larger cities.
John: What does that word mean?
Nana: It means “shared economy.” Renting out property, cars, or tools to other people when you’re not using them is becoming more and more popular.
John: Oh yeah, those services are becoming very popular. There’s so many websites and apps to help too.
Nana: Right, but it’s not as straightforward as that. And I think many people get confused about the money side of things.
John: You mean regarding taxes and insurance?
Nana: Yes, not only are the users of the services confused, but I think some authorities are too.
John: Yeah, knowledge of the laws isn’t keeping up with knowledge of the services. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: fælles [natural native speed]
John: common, mutual, collective
Nana: fælles slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fælles [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: henvise [natural native speed]
John: to refer
Nana: henvise [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: henvise [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: rente [natural native speed]
John: interest rate
Nana: rente [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: rente [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: bortrejst [natural native speed]
John: out of town, gone away
Nana: bortrejst [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: bortrejst [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: evig [natural native speed]
John: eternal
Nana: evig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: evig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: gæld [natural native speed]
John: debt
Nana: gæld [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: gæld [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: indgå [natural native speed]
John: to enter into
Nana: indgå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: indgå [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: udbetale [natural native speed]
John: to pay out
Nana: udbetale [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: udbetale [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: saldo [natural native speed]
John: balance
Nana: saldo [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: saldo [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: indbetale [natural native speed]
John: to pay in
Nana: indbetale [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: indbetale [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: fælles konto
John: meaning "joint account." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: The first word, fælles, means "joint," or "common," or "mutual."
John: It’s an adjective.
Nana: Right. The second word, konto, means "account."
John: And it’s a common gender noun. So this is a pretty literal expression.
Nana: Yes. Sometimes the phrase is used as the common gender noun fælleskonto.
John: It becomes one word instead of two.
Nana: The meaning doesn’t change, however.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Der er både fordele og ulemper ved en fælles konto.
John: ...which means "There are both pros and cons with a joint account."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: for evigt
John: Meaning "forever, for good." What can you tell us about this expression?
Nana: This is a fixed phrase. It consists of the preposition for,
John: which means "for,"
Nana: and the adjective evigt, which means "eternal."
John: That makes sense. “For eternal,” or “forever.”
Nana: Yes, you use it like the English version, and it usually goes at the end of a sentence.
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Vi kan ikke vente her for evigt.
John: ...which means "We cannot wait here forever."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the right compound at the right time.
John: What’s the most important thing that we need to know about compounds in Danish?
Nana: Loose compound verbs are words that can be divided. Solid compounds can never be divided. They’re also called fake and real compounds.
John: The meanings can differ, depending on whether they are fake or real.
Nana: Yes. In formal and official situations, it’s best to use solid compounds. Keep the loose compounds for informal situations.
John: Also, loose compound verbs tend to have a concrete meaning, while solid compound verbs have a more figurative meaning.
Nana: Danish compound verbs can also be formed by combining a noun, adjective, or verb with a verb.
John: Okay, so let’s look at some examples.
Nana: The loose compound vise hen means…
John: “to show,”
Nana: but the solid compound henvise means…
John: “to refer.” So the meanings are a little similar, but different enough to actually be different words. Can we see another example?
Nana: Sure. We have the loose compound gå over
John: which means “to go across,”
Nana: and the solid compound overgå
John: meaning “to outdo.” This time, the meanings are quite different. Be sure that you’re using the right compound in the right way for the right situation!
Nana: A lot of compound verbs use the adverbs ind and ud.
John: These are adverbs of place and mean “in” and “out” respectively.
Nana: An example of them being used is skrive ind
John: a loose compound meaning “to write in,”
Nana: and indskrive
John: a solid compound meaning “to register.” In the case of the solid compound, the adverb was a prefix.
Nana: Yes. Even though they use the same verb, the position of ind- or ud- totally changes the meaning.
John: And sometimes, when the verb is followed by the prefix it makes no sense.
Nana: Yes, uddanne is a solid compound that means “to train.” But, the loose compound danne ud has no meaning.
John: Are there any other adverbs that work in the same way as the two we just talked about?
Nana: Yes, hen and bort. Hen is used to indicate direction or movement towards a specific destination, result, or a changed condition. And bort simply means “away.”
John: Again, some compounds don’t make sense when these adverbs follow the verb.
Nana: Right. One that does make sense is rykke hen,
John: a loose compound that means “to move to.”
Nana: The solid compound henrykke means “to charm.”
John: Those meanings are really different. Let’s finish on one last example.
Nana: The solid compound bortkomme means “to get lost.”The loose compound komme bort, however, makes no sense.
John: There are more examples in the lesson notes, so make sure you check them out, listeners!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

3 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you have any questions about compounds?

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:10 PM
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Hi Roger.


Thank you for your question.


"Opgive" means to give up, to renounce or to provide, whereas "give op" only means to give up as in dropping something. Another difference is that the latter can't have an object, so if one wants to give up something specific, the former version is used.


Good example, but it should be "(Jeg) sætter kedlen over, mens jeg oversætter denne tekst".


Have a fine day.


Cheers


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger
Monday at 03:41 PM
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Hvad er forskellen mellem 'opgive' og 'give op'?

Sætte over kedlen, mens jeg oversæt denne tekst.