Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 3 - Deciding Whether To Go To the Beach in Denmark. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express opinions through factual statements. The conversation takes place in the garden.
Nana: It's between Mia and Johan.
John: The speakers are siblings. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mia: Tror du, det holder tørt hele dagen?
Johan: Ifølge denne vejrudsigt skulle det holde tørt med nogen sol indtil i aften.
Mia: Hmm, skal vi tage på stranden?
Johan: Tja, temperaturen når helt op mellem 20 og 25 grader.
Mia: Dejligt!
Johan: Ja, der er højtryk over hele landet i øjeblikket, men der er stadig køligt i skyggen.
Mia: Hvad med vinden? Jeg hader at få sand i mine øjne.
Johan: Der står, der kommer let til frisk vind fra vest.
Mia: Vi kan måske sidde i læ i klitterne.
Johan: Hov, vent! Der står, der kan komme jævn til hård vind ved kysterne.
Mia: Øv! Så lad os bare blive her i haven.
Johan: Eller måske gå indenfor... Jeg fik lige en regndråbe på min mobil.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Mia: Do you think it will stay dry throughout the day?
Johan: According to this weather forecast, it should stay dry with some sun until tonight.
Mia: Hmm, should we go to the beach?
Johan: Well, the temperature will reach up between 20 and 25 degrees.
Mia: Nice!
Johan: Yes, there is a high-pressure front covering the whole country at the moment, but it is still cool in the shade.
Mia: What about the wind? I hate getting sand in my eyes.
Johan: It says there will be light to fresh wind from the west.
Mia: Perhaps we can be sheltered in the dunes.
Johan: Oh wait! It says there could be even to strong wind by the coasts.
Mia: Damn! Then let's just stay here in the garden.
Johan: Or maybe go inside... I just got a raindrop on my phone.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: I must admit, that when I think of countries with beaches, Denmark isn’t near the top of the list.
Nana: I’m sure it isn’t! But if you remember the geography of Denmark, there’s a lot of coastline.
John: I guess Denmark IS pretty much surrounded by water! I never thought of it like that. So what are the beaches like in Denmark?
Nana: The coastline has dunes and beaches that are unspoiled and open to everyone.
John: That sounds good!
Nana: To keep them unspoiled, there is a 300 meter beach protection zone, and a coast protection zone of 3 km.
John: Is there anything I can do as an individual to keep the coastline clean and protected?
Nana: Don’t drive or ride your car or bicycle near the coastline, and use the built paths in protected areas.
John: How about bonfires and tents, things you often see on beaches?
Nana: No, and no! You should only stay for short periods of time, too.
John: It sounds like there are a lot of rules and regulations.
Nana: There are, and they differ from area to area, so always check. You might be allowed to have that bonfire, after all.
John: Great! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: tør [natural native speed]
John: dry
Nana: tør [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tør [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: grad [natural native speed]
John: degree
Nana: grad [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: grad [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: højtryk [natural native speed]
John: anticyclone, high pressure
Nana: højtryk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: højtryk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: land [natural native speed]
John: country
Nana: land [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: land [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: kølig [natural native speed]
John: chilly, cool
Nana: kølig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: kølig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: skygge [natural native speed]
John: shade, shadow, brim, peak
Nana: skygge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: skygge [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: vind [natural native speed]
John: wind
Nana: vind [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: vind [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: let til frisk [natural native speed]
John: light to fresh
Nana: let til frisk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: let til frisk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: jævn til hård [natural native speed]
John: even to strong
Nana: jævn til hård [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: jævn til hård [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Nana: regndråbe [natural native speed]
John: raindrop
Nana: regndråbe [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: regndråbe [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Nana: over hele landet
John: Meaning "all over the country." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: This fixed phrase includes the preposition over, which means "over," the adjective hele, which means "whole," and landet, which is the neuter gender noun land in definite form, meaning "the country”.
John: How is it used?
Nana: You use it when you talk about something that is nationwide.
John: So something that is affecting the entire country.
Nana: Right, you might also hear i hele landet.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Elever over hele landet tog til stranden.
John: ...which means "Students all over the country went to the beach." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: let til frisk vind
John: Meaning "light to fresh wind." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The first word of the phrase is the adjective let, which means "light." Then we have the preposition til, which means "to.”
John: And what are the third and fourth words in the phrase?
Nana: The adjective frisk, which means "fresh." And finally, the common gender noun vind, which means "wind."
John: Is this an idiom or does it literally mean “light to fresh wind”?
Nana: It’s not an idiom. It’s weather lingo so you’ll hear it in weather reports a lot.
John: I see. Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Vi får en let til frisk vind fra vest.
John: ... which means "We will get a light to fresh wind from the west." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: jævn til hård vind
John: Meaning "even to strong wind." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The first word jævn is an adjective with several meanings, such as "even". The second word til is the preposition "to."
John: And what are the third and fourth words in this phrase?
Nana: Hård, which is an adjective meaning "hard”. And finally, the last word vind means "wind" and it is a common gender noun.
John: Is this another phrase we would hear in the weather forecasts, like the last phrase?
Nana: Yes, more weather lingo.
John: Right. Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... I nat bliver vinden jævn til hård.
John: ... which means "Tonight the wind will be even to strong." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about expressing opinions through factual statements. How do you do this in Danish?
Nana: One way is by using the preposition ifølge.
John: This means “according to”.
Nana: In Danish, you use ifølge in front of the noun, pronoun or noun phrase showing who or what something is according to.
John: How do you say “according to the expert”?
Nana: Ifølge eksperten.
John: Ah yes, the preposition goes before the word for “expert”. Can we have another example?
Nana: Ifølge eksperten kan vi regne med godt vejr.
John: “According to the expert we can count on good weather.” How about an example that doesn’t involve an expert?
Nana: Hvordan ser prognosen ud ifølge din mobil?
John: “How does the forecast look according to your phone?” So, you don’t just have to reference people.
Nana: No, it can be according to anything.
John: Do you have another way that we can express opinions via factual statements?
Nana: We can use the phrase der står.
John: This means something like “it says” in English.
Nana: It consists of the formal subject der, which means “it,” and the irregular verb stå in present tense, which literally means “stands.” But yes, it is used as “it says”.
John: How is this used in a sentence?
Nana: We use der står before the main clause or subordinate clause.
John: Some examples, please?
Nana: Der står, de har begået en fejl.
John: “It says they have made a mistake.”
Nana: Der står ikke, hvor varmt det bliver.
John: “It does not say how warm it will get.” So you can use this pattern for negative sentences too?
Nana: Yes, just add ikke after der står.
John: Easy!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej

4 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners, write a sentence using the phrase der står.

Tricia
Thursday at 09:44 PM
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"Of course, in this case, forstår is equivalent of "says," in English"...do you mean der står? Doesn't forstår mean to understand? I'm confused.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 12:23 AM
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Hi Roger.


Thanks for your comment. Your sentences are almost flawless. I think you were aiming at this:


"Ifølge Mette Wagner kan skyer trække ind over landet i løbet af ugen."


and "Der står 'mandag til onsdag kan der komme nattefrost'." or "Der står, at mandag til onsdag kan der komme nattefrost."


Keep up the good work.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger Haycock
Tuesday at 02:57 PM
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Ifølge Mette Wagner skyer kan trække ind over landet i løbet af ugen.


Der står mandag til onsdag kan der komme nattefrost.