Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 4 - Running Into an Old Friend in Denmark. John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to catch up by using past simple tense. The conversation takes place in the street.
Nana: It's between Emily and Jon.
John: The speakers are friends. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Emilie: Jon! Hvor er det længe siden!
Jon: Emilie?! Sikke en overraskelse. Jeg vidste slet ikke, du var tilbage i Danmark.
Emilie: Jeg kom tilbage i forrige uge.
Jon: Du ser glad ud. Havde du en god tur?
Emilie: Ja, det kan du tro. Jeg oplevede mange spændende ting.
Jon: Okay... Mødte du også mange spændende mennesker?
Emilie: Jo... Det gjorde jeg. Folk fra hele verden!
Jon: Ja, jeg prøvede at følge med på din blog, men da jeg kom ind på mit ønskede studium, gik det i stå.
Jon: Og så fik jeg også arbejde på en café, så der skete pludselig meget.
Emilie: Det må du nok sige. Jeg er imponeret.
Jon: Du troede måske, at jeg lå og drev tiden væk?
Emilie: Tja... Åh, jeg er nødt til at løbe. Vi ses!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Emily: Jon! Long time no see!
Jon: Emily?! What a surprise. I didn't know you were back in Denmark.
Emily: I came back the week before last week.
Jon: You look happy. Did you have a nice trip?
Emily: Yes, you bet. I experienced many exciting things.
Jon: Okay... Did you also meet many interesting people?
Emily: Well, yes... I did. People from all over the world!
Jon: Yes, I tried to follow on your blog, but when I got into my desired course of study, it came to a standstill.
Jon: And then I also got a job at a café so a lot happened suddenly.
Emily: You can say that again. I'm impressed.
Jon: Perhaps you thought that I was lying around and idling away time?
Emily: Well... Oh, I have to run. See you!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: So Emily was traveling, and Jon was studying.
Nana: Their two paths were very different, huh?
John: It’s good that they could meet up again though.
Nana: After high school there are many paths you can take.
John: What types of things are popular?
Nana: It’s popular to take a gap year during which you can volunteer, travel, or work. Or all three, if you don’t have enough money to just travel.
John: Is there a special name for this kind of trip?
Nana: It can be called dannelsesrejse, or “educational trip”.
John: But Jon didn’t go traveling, he’s studying.
Nana: That’s right. Many enroll in university or a university college.
John: Are there other educational or training courses available?
Nana: Yes, some people go to folk high schools, and these offer education and social activities through long or short-term courses.
John: Sounds like a good place to “grow.” Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nana: længe siden [natural native speed]
John: long time no see
Nana: længe siden [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: længe siden [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: vide [natural native speed]
John: to know
Nana: vide [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: vide [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: slet [natural native speed]
John: at all
Nana: slet [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: slet [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: forrige [natural native speed]
John: previous, last
Nana: forrige [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: forrige [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: glad [natural native speed]
John: happy, glad
Nana: glad [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: glad [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: tro [natural native speed]
John: to believe, to think
Nana: tro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: tro [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: opleve [natural native speed]
John: to experience
Nana: opleve [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: opleve [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: gøre [natural native speed]
John: to do, to make
Nana: gøre [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: gøre [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: få [natural native speed]
John: to get
Nana: få [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: få [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Nana: ligge [natural native speed]
John: to lie, to be, to be situated, to stand
Nana: ligge [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ligge [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Nana: slet ikke
John: Meaning "not at all". What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The phrase is made up of two adverbs.
John: What are the two adverbs?
Nana: The first one, slet, is difficult to translate on its own, but it often means "at all" when combined with other words. The second adverb ikke means "not."
John: How is this phrase used?
Nana: You can use this to emphasise the negative in a sentence.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Han troede hende slet ikke.
John: ...which means "He did not believe her at all." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: se glad ud
John: Meaning "to look happy". What can you tell us about this?
Nana: This phrase consists of the irregular verb se, the adjective glad, and the adverb ud.
John: How is it used?
Nana: You use it to describe someone or something looking happy.
John: Can you switch the adjective for “happy” with a different adjective?
Nana: Of course! Du ser træt ud is “You look tired”, for example.
John: Can you give us an example using the original phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Ikke alle så glade ud efter mødet.
John: ... which means "Not everyone looked happy after the meeting." Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: kunne tro
John: Meaning "to believe, to bet". What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The phrase is made of the modal verb kunne and the regular verb tro.
John: Ah, we came across this modal verb in an earlier lesson and it means “to be able to”.
Nana: Right. And tro means “to believe” or “to think”.
John: And this phrase is used for being able to believe in something?
Nana: Yes, and it can also be used like “you bet”, to show certainty.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Du kan tro, jeg har savnet dig.
John: ... which means "You can be certain I have missed you." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about catching up by using past simple tense. I think that we’re going to start by reviewing the most important verb.
Nana: I think you’re right! We will start by looking at the verb være, which means “to be”.
John: In English, this verb is important, but also frustrating because the conjugations are irregular.
Nana: I’m afraid that it’s the same in Danish! It can also be used as an auxiliary verb to make different tenses.
John: Let’s check out some of these conjugations then.
Nana: Sure. In present tense it is er, in simple past tense it is var, and as the past participle it is været
John: Wow, those are very irregular, especially the present tense form! Listeners, if you need to double-check these, remember that they’re in the lesson notes! So, let’s hear a sample sentence using one!
Nana: Pigen er glad for at se ham igen.
John: “The girl is happy to see him again.” So, we just talked about an important irregular verb. How do you conjugate regular verbs?
Nana: Firstly, you need to know how to create the base form. Most Danish verbs end in -e, and we remove that to get the base form, or imperative form.
John: Do you have an example?
Nana: Sure. vente means “to wait”. If you drop the -e, you get the base form vent.
John: And from the base form, you can conjugate?
Nana: Yes, but there are two types of regular verbs. Type 1 are conjugated into the past tense by adding -ede to the base of the verb.
John: And how are Type 2 conjugated?
Nana: By adding -te. An example of a past tense Type 2 verb is mødte.
John: Which is the past tense of “to meet”.
Nana: Be careful with Type 2 verbs, because there is a vowel change in the base form with some when forming past tense and the past participle.
John: Can we hear a couple of example sentences with regular verbs?
Nana: Historierne varede for evigt.
John: “The stories lasted forever.”
Nana: Købte du en souvenir til alle?
John: “Did you buy a souvenir for everyone?”
Nana: And finally, irregular verbs. There are about 120 of these, and we can also call them Type 3. You form the present tense by adding -r to the end of the verb in the infinitive form of the verb.
John: How do they conjugate into past tense?
Nana: There is no set way. In the lesson notes, there is a table with some of the most common irregular verbs and there you’ll see that there are many different conjugations.
John: So listeners, be sure to check out those notes!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej

3 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hey Listeners, what did you do last weekend? *In Danish of course.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 10:35 PM
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Hi Roger.


Thanks for sharing.


That's really well written. However, there are a few mistakes. Here's what I believe you wanted to write:


"Sidste weekend var jeg hjemme, for her i England er vi indelukket.

Jeg tog [from "tage"] på en cykeltur søndag eftermiddag.

Søndag spiste jeg kylling til aftenmad, drak rosévin og så en koncert i fjernsynet."


Keep up the good work.


Best regards


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger Haycock
Wednesday at 03:04 PM
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Sidste weekend var jeg hjemme, for her i England er vi indesluttet.

Jeg gik på en cykeltur søndag eftermiddag.

Søndag spiste jeg kylling til aftenmed, drak rosenvin og så en koncert på fjernsynet.