Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 5 - Make Sure You Listen to your Danish Friend! John here.
Nana: Hej I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to do active listening during a conversation. The conversation takes place in the kitchen.
Nana: It's between Carsten and Theresa.
John: The speakers are a couple. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Carsten: Hold op, hvor er jeg udmattet...!
Theresa: Nåh... Var det en hård dag på arbejdet?
Carsten: Kun halvdelen af klassen mødte op til timen i dag.
Theresa: Virkelig? Kun halvdelen? Okay så...
Carsten: Ja...
Theresa: Jaså... Det var ikke mange.
Carsten: Nej, men vi gennemgik alligevel det, jeg havde forberedt.
Theresa: Nå okay, det var godt. Så var det måske ikke så skidt endda?
Carsten: Jo, for inden timen var slut, var tre af eleverne nødt til at gå.
Theresa: Ser man det. Hvad var grunden til, at de var nødt til at gå?
Carsten: De skulle åbenbart til et møde. Det var noget med planlægning af afslutningsfesten. Jeg formoder, det var vigtigt.
Theresa: [suk] Du husker tydeligvis ikke, da du selv var 3. g'er.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Carsten: Oh my, I'm exhausted...!
Theresa: Oh... Was it a hard day at work?
Carsten: Only half of the class showed up for the class today.
Theresa: Really? Only half? Well then...
Carsten: Yes...
Theresa: Oh yeah...? That wasn't a lot.
Carsten: No, but we went through what I had prepared anyway.
Theresa: Oh okay, good. So perhaps it wasn't all that bad?
Carsten: It was because three of the students had to go before the class was over.
Theresa: What do you know? What was the reason they had to leave?
Carsten: Apparently, they were going to a meeting. It was something about planning the prom. I assume it was important.
Theresa: [sigh] You clearly don't remember when you were a senior.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Sounds like a tough day.
Nana: Yes, Carsten sounded disappointed with how things turned out.
John: What is high school like in Denmark?
Nana: It takes three years to complete upper secondary, or senior high school.
John: Only three years? What are those years like?
Nana: We call the first year 1.g and that’s a tough year.
John: Oh yeah, you learn so many things and have to get used to being in senior high.
Nana: But 2.g, or second grade, is even harder.
John: Is the third year any easier? It is the final year after all.
Nana: 3.g has a reputation of being easier than 2.g, but I found it harder.
John: Why’s that?
Nana: I had less motivation to study and just wanted to get out and graduate.
John: But you should work hard during your final year, cause it’s your last chance to get a good grade! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Nana: holde [natural native speed]
John: to hold, to stop, to keep, to last
Nana: holde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: holde [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: nåh [natural native speed]
John: well, oh, so
Nana: nåh [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nåh [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: hvor [natural native speed]
John: where, how
Nana: hvor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: hvor [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: møde op [natural native speed]
John: to show up
Nana: møde op [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: møde op [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: virkelig [natural native speed]
John: real, actual
Nana: virkelig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: virkelig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: okay [natural native speed]
John: okay, OK
Nana: okay [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: okay [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: jaså [natural native speed]
John: is that so? indeed?
Nana: jaså [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: jaså [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: nå [natural native speed]
John: well, oh
Nana: nå [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nå [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Nana: ser man det [natural native speed]
John: is that a fact
Nana: ser man det [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ser man det [natural native speed]
John: And last..
Nana: 3. g'er [natural native speed]
John: student in the third class in senior high school
Nana: 3. g'er [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: 3. g'er [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: holde op
John: Meaning "to stop, to cut out". What can you tell us about this?
Nana: This phrase is made of the irregular verb holde, meaning “to hold” and the adverb op, meaning “up”.
John: How do you use this phrase?
Nana: It’s used to say that you will stop doing something, or that you want someone else to stop.
John: Are there any other ways to use it?
Nana: If you use it on its own, with holde in imperative form, it can be used to show frustration or amazement.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Kan du ikke snart holde op med at brokke dig?
John: ...which means "Can't you stop complaining soon?" Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: okay så
John: Meaning "well then, alright then". What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The phrase consists of the adjective okay, which means the same in Danish as in English, and the adverb så which means "then."
John: How do you use it?
Nana: Like in English, the phrase can be used to show that you are listening to someone, or also to move onto a new subject.
John: In English, you have to be careful with your tone when you say “well then”.
Nana: It’s the same in Danish. You don’t want to sound bored or annoyed, unless that IS your intention!
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say... Okay så... I kan gå tidligere.
John: ... which means "Alright then... You can leave earlier." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to do active listening during a conversation. I feel that we will be learning a few interjections in this lesson.
Nana: Are you sure you’re not psychic? The first interjections I want to introduce are nå and nåh.
John: They sound very similar. Are there any differences?
Nana: Not in meaning, no. The spelling differs from person to person.
John: How are they used?
Nana: They can stand alone, or appear at the very beginning of a sentence and usually mean “well” or “oh, I see.”
John: So they can be used to respond to something that someone else has said.
Nana: That’s right. Take the example Nå, det skal nok blive bedre i morgen.
John: “Well, it will probably get better tomorrow.”
Nana: The next interjection I want to introduce is jaså. This is similar to “is that so?” or “indeed?” in English.
John: Can this also stand alone or be at the start of a sentence?
Nana: Yes, it can. And you can use it to express surprise, scepticism, or wonder.
John: And an example sentence, please?
Nana: Jaså! Det skal I ikke slippe godt fra!
John: “Oh, yeah? You will not get away with that!”
Nana: And the final expression for this lesson is the phrase ser man det.
John: Can you break down this phrase for us?
Nana: There is the irregular verb se, which means “to see”, the pronoun man which means “one” or “you,” and finally, the pronoun det which means “it” or “that.”
John: So altogether it means...
Nana: Something like “Is that a fact?”
John: That sounds slightly cynical and skeptical.
Nana: It can be if you want it to be! Be careful with your tone.
John: Can you give us an example sentence?
Nana: Ser man det. Skulle I ikke være til time nu?
John: “Is that so? Shouldn’t you be in class now?”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej

3 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners, can you use the phrase ser man det in a sentence?

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:47 PM
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Hi Roger.


Thank you for your response.


That's really well done. Keep it up.


Cheers


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger Haycock
Thursday at 03:14 PM
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Jaså, jeg kan ikke finde jaså i min ordbog.

Ser man det. Man skal betale kirkeskat i Danmark.

Nå, det ved jeg ikke.