Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 7 - A Barrage of Danish Apologies. John here.
Nana: Hej, I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to take control of a difficult conversation. The conversation takes place at a party.
Nana: It's between Emily and Jon.
John: The speakers are friends. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Emilie: Undskyld, jeg går lige herover et øjeblik... Hej Jon!
Jon: Åh, hej. Er du også her?
Emilie: Ja, jeg er her sørme også. Undskyld, jeg var nødt til at smutte forleden, men jeg...
Jon: Lad mig afbryde dig med det samme! Du behøver ikke at undskylde. Det var mig, der var...
Emilie: Undskyld, må jeg lige have lov til at tale færdig?!
Jon: Ja, men først vil jeg lige sige, at det er mig, der siger undskyld... For alt.
Emilie: Åh... Hør her, jeg har tænkt lidt. Måske var vi lige gode om det... Det var bare ikke det rette tidspunkt.
Jon: Ville du have lyst til at drikke noget kaffe en dag? Måske på...
Emilie: Efter festen?
Jon: Ja, det ville også fungere. Det er en aftale.
Emilie: Nå, men for at vende tilbage til det, jeg prøvede at sige.
Jon: Ja?
Emilie: Jeg var nødt til at smutte, fordi min bil holdt ulovligt parkeret.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Emily: Excuse me, I'm just going to go over here for a minute... Hi Jon!
Jon: Oh, hi. Are you here, too?
Emily: Yes, I am here, too, indeed. Sorry I had to split the other day, but I...
Jon: Let me interrupt you right away! You don't have to apologize. It was me who was...
Emily: Sorry, may I just be allowed to finish talking?!
Jon: Yes, but first I want to say that it is me who is saying sorry... For everything.
Emily: Oh... Listen, I've been thinking. Maybe we were equally responsible... It just wasn't the right time.
Jon: Would you feel like drinking some coffee one day? Perhaps on...
Emily: After the party?
Jon: Yes, that would work too. It's a deal.
Emily: Anyway, to return to what I was trying to say.
Jon: Yes?
Emily: I had to split because my car was parked illegally.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: There was lots of apologizing in this lesson’s conversation.
Nana: Yeah, they were fighting over who would apologize first.
John: Emily was finally able to explain the problem at the end of the conversation.
Nana: Yeah, she was parked illegally. No wonder she had to leave!
John: Yes, you should never park illegally. What are the rules for parking in Denmark?
Nana: You must park at least 10 meters away from a transversal street or bicycle lane.
John: That makes sense. Give people room to move.
Nana: And if there is an exit to a bike lane, you must park at least 5 meters away from it.
John: I guess that there is no parking on sidewalks?
Nana: No, unless it explicitly states that you can, of course.
John: If you are parked illegally, what are the fines like?
Nana: You can be fined at least 510 kroner for parking illegally, so don't forget to check your p-skive.
John: That’s your “parking disc.” Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: undskyld [natural native speed]
John: excuse me, sorry, pardon
Nana: undskyld [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: undskyld [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: sørme [natural native speed]
John: jolly well, indeed
Nana: sørme [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: sørme [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: smutte [natural native speed]
John: to nip, to split, to slip
Nana: smutte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: smutte [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: afbryde [natural native speed]
John: to interrupt
Nana: afbryde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: afbryde [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: lov [natural native speed]
John: law, permission
Nana: lov [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lov [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: god [natural native speed]
John: good, kind, good-natured
Nana: god [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: god [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ret [natural native speed]
John: straight, right
Nana: ret [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ret [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: lyst [natural native speed]
John: desire, urge
Nana: lyst [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: lyst [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: fungere [natural native speed]
John: to work, to function
Nana: fungere [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: fungere [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: ulovlig [natural native speed]
John: illegal
Nana: ulovlig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ulovlig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: have lov
John: meaning "to be allowed, to have permission, to be entitled." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb to have. The second word lov is the common gender noun "law" or "permission."
John: How do we use this phrase?
Nana: We use it to say that someone has permission or is allowed to do something. Just add the preposition til, meaning “to,” and what you have permission to do.
John: That sounds easy enough. Are there any variations on this?
Nana: The verb have is interchangeable with the irregular verb få, which means "to get."
John: Can you give us an example using this word?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Du har ikke lov til at komme ind.
John: ...which means "You are not allowed to come in."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: være lige gode om
John: Meaning "to be equally good, to be equally responsible." How is this phrase constructed?
Nana: It has the irregular verb være, which means "to be." Next the adjective lige, which means "equal." Then, the adjective god, which means "good," and finally the preposition om, which means "about."
John: How is it used?
Nana: You can use it when two or more subjects have equal shares in something, or when they are equally responsible for something.
John: So, if we wanted to say that both people in a couple were equally responsible for the problems they were having, we could use this phrase?
Nana: Yes. You could say Parret er lige gode om problemerne.
John: Can you give us another example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Værterne er lige gode om at være stædige.
John: ...which means "The hosts are being stubborn to equal extent."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: have lyst
John: Meaning "to feel like." What can you tell us about this construction?
Nana: It has the irregular verb have, meaning "to have," and the common gender noun lyst, which means "desire" or "urge."
John: How do we use it?
Nana: You can use it when you want to express that you want something or feel like doing something.
John: So it can be used for sentences like “The woman wants coffee.”
Nana: Right. That’s Kvinden har lyst til kaffe, by the way.
John: Can you give us another example using this word?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Har nogen lyst til flere drinks?
John: ...which means "Does anyone feel like more drinks?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn how to take control of a difficult conversation.
John: So, how can we do this in Danish?
Nana: Well, maybe you’re in a difficult conversation because you did something wrong.
John: That happens to me a lot!
Nana: Or maybe you want to start a difficult conversation in a nice and polite way. Can you think of a word in English that would help?
John: An English word? Hmm. How about “sorry?”
Nana: Yes, that’s the word I was looking for! In Danish, we say undskyld and you can use that at the beginning of a sentence or on its own.
John: Can you give us some example sentences using this word?
Nana: Sure. Undskyld. Det kommer ikke mig ved.
John: “Sorry. It’s none of my business.”
Nana: Undskyld, var det ikke hans tur til at tale?
John: “Sorry, wasn’t it his turn to speak?”
Nana: It’s also good to use the imperative form in these situations.
John: How do you do that in Danish?
Nana: It’s the shortest form that the verbs can take. In Danish, you just remove the final e from the verb.
John: Well, that’s easy enough. Let’s hear some examples.
Nana: For example, “to speak” is tale, and the imperative form is tal.
John: How do we say “speak nicely!”
Nana: Tal pænt!
John: And finally for this lesson, let’s introduce an adverb.
Nana: Yes, the adverb sørme.
John: This can be translated as “indeed.”
Nana: Indeed it can. It’s used to emphasize an opinion or something like that.
John: Can we have an example?
Nana: Gæsterne så sørme overraskede ud.
John: “The guests looked surprised indeed.”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

3 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! How do you usually handle a difficult conversation?

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:58 PM
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Hi Roger.


Thanks for commenting.


That's all correct. Keep up the good work!


Cheers


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger Haycock
Saturday at 03:20 PM
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Jeg lærer sørme dansk i dag.

Det har sørme været en sjov undervisningstime.

undskyld, jeg glemte at sige tak.