Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to DanishClass101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 8 - Haggling at a Danish Market. John here.
Nana: Hej, I'm Nana.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe objects with adjectives. The conversation takes place at a flea market.
Nana: It's between Helle and Kim.
John: The speakers are strangers. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Helle: Hej. Hvor meget skal du have for de hvide og blå kopper?
Kim: 25 kroner per styk.
Helle: Hmm. Må jeg lige se nærmere på dem?
Kim: Selvfølgelig. Tag dig bare god tid. Jeg er her et par timer endnu.
Helle: Tak. Tja, kopperne er fine, men lidt dyre. Kan vi prutte lidt om prisen?
Kim: Tjo... Hvor meget ville du have skudt på at de kostede?
Helle: Hvis jeg skal være ærlig, ville jeg have gættet på 10 kroner per styk. Mere vil jeg ikke give.
Kim: 10 kroner?! Du må have spist søm!
Helle: Hvad nu hvis jeg køber alle 8 kopper? Jeg kan se, at nogle af dem er pænere end andre.
Kim: Hmm... Kan du ikke bare tage dem, der er mest velholdte?
Helle: Nej, det er bedst med et helt sæt.
Kim: Okay, så. Men kun fordi du er den pæneste kunde, jeg har haft i dag.
Helle: Jeg siger tak for en god handel.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Helle: Hello. How much do you want for the white and blue cups?
Kim: 25 kroner apiece.
Helle: Hmm. Can I just have a closer look at them?
Kim: Of course. Just take your time. I'm here for another couple of hours.
Helle: Thank you. Well, the cups are fine, but a little expensive. Can we haggle a bit about the price?
Kim: Well... How much would you have guessed they cost?
Helle: To be honest, I would have guessed ten kroner apiece. I won't give more.
Kim: Ten kroner?! You must be out of your mind!
Helle: What if I buy all eight cups? I can see that some of them are prettier than others.
Kim: Hmm... Can't you just take those that are best-maintained?
Helle: No, it is best with a whole set.
Kim: Alright, then. But only because you are the prettiest customer I've had today.
Helle: Thank you for a good deal.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: There was a bit of haggling in that conversation.
Nana: Yes, Helle wanted to get a good deal on those cups.
John: It was a flea market, right? You have to get a good deal. How do we say “flea market” in Danish?
Nana: loppemarkede.
John: Thank you. Are they strict? Or can anyone sell at a flea market?
Nana: Anyone can! You don’t have to be a store or a trader.
John: Flea markets are a great way to get rid things from your home that you no longer want.
Nana: Right. Clear out your attic and sell it! There are a few items that you can’t sell without special permission, though.
John: Like what?
Nana: Food, drinks… Things like that.
John: That’s understandable. When is the best time to go to a flea market in Denmark?
Nana: During weekends and usually between April and October.
John: Good to know! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Nana: hvor meget [natural native speed]
John: how much
Nana: hvor meget [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: hvor meget [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: per styk [natural native speed]
John: apiece
Nana: per styk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: per styk [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: nær [natural native speed]
John: near, close
Nana: nær [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: nær [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: prutte [natural native speed]
John: to fart, to break wind
Nana: prutte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: prutte [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: pris [natural native speed]
John: price, prize
Nana: pris [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: pris [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: skyde [natural native speed]
John: to shoot
Nana: skyde [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: skyde [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: ærlig [natural native speed]
John: honest, frank, sincere
Nana: ærlig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: ærlig [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: gætte [natural native speed]
John: to guess
Nana: gætte [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: gætte [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Nana: søm [natural native speed]
John: nail
Nana: søm [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: søm [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Nana: handel [natural native speed]
John: deal, bargain, trade, commerce, trading
Nana: handel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Nana: handel [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is...
Nana: prutte om prisen
John: meaning "to haggle." What can you tell us about this phrase?
Nana: The phrase consists of the regular verb prutte, which means "to fart..."
John: Wait, what? Really? Did you get the meaning right there?
Nana: I did, trust me! The other words are om, which means "about," and last, the common gender noun pris in definite form. This means "the price."
John: And all together this means “to haggle?” Can you use this in a formal situation?
Nana: Definitely not, no! Instead you can use the verb forhandle, meaning “to negotiate.”
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Det nyttede ikke at prutte om prisen.
John: ...which means "It was no use haggling."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: skyde på
John: Meaning "to guess." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The first word is the irregular verb skyde, which means "to shoot." The second word is the preposition på, which means "on" or "at."
John: How do we use this phrase?
Nana: It’s used informally to say that we are guessing.
John: Ah, you’re “shooting” at the answer, I suppose.
Nana: Yes. But you can say this more formally with the verb gætte.
John: Can you give us an example using the phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Jeg vil skyde på, at den var dyr.
John: ...which means "I am guessing that it was expensive."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Nana: have spist søm
John: Meaning "to be out of one's mind." What can you tell us about this?
Nana: The phrase is made of the irregular verb have, which means "to have." Next, the regular verb spise in present perfect tense, which means "eaten." And finally, the neuter gender noun søm, which means "nails."
John: So it literally means “to have eaten nails?” I think you need to explain this idiom for us!
Nana: In this case, the “nails” we are talking about are not the ones on your fingers, but ones that you hammer in.
John: I guess that if you eat nails, you would be out of your mind?
Nana: That’s definitely one way to remember it! This is very informal, so be careful when using it.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Nana: Sure. For example, you can say, Du vil låne 500 kroner til?! Har du spist søm?!
John: ...which means "You want to borrow another 500 kroner?! Are you out of your mind?!" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to describe objects with adjectives.
John: So, how do we use adjectives with nouns?
Nana: We need to conjugate the adjective to match the gender of the noun.
John: Let’s quickly recap noun genders in Danish.
Nana: There are two - common or neuter. When describing a common gender noun, the adjective isn’t conjugated and stays in the dictionary form.
John: That’s nice and easy! How about neuter gender nouns?
Nana: You should add -t to the end of the adjective. But, you don’t add -t if the noun ends in either -sk or a vowel.
John: Are there any other exceptions?
Nana: Yes, the adjectives fri and ny, which mean “free” and “new,” and all adjectives ending in the vowel ‘å.’
John: Let’s look at some examples. Can you give us an example using the adjective “special?”
Nana: In Danish this is særlig. So, Vi fandt en særlig samling.
John: “We found a special collection.” That’s a sentence with a common gender noun. Do you have a sentence with a neuter noun?
Nana: Sælgeren giver et særligt tilbud.
John: “The salesman is giving a special offer.” Are the conjugation rules the same when a noun is in a plural form?
Nana: No, they aren’t. With nouns in plural form, we conjugate adjectives to suit the number, not the gender. So you add -e to the end of the adjectives.
John: And what are the exceptions?
Nana: Again, nouns ending in vowels, except fri and ny, meaning “free” and “new,” respectively.
John: And again, let’s hear an example for “special.”
Nana: Der er særlige samlinger på markedet.
John: “There are special collections at the market.” And finally, how about changing nouns from indefinite to definite singular form?
Nana: There are two ways to do this. You can either add a definite article in front of the noun, or you can add -en or -et to the end of the noun.
John: What are the definite articles that we can use?
Nana: You use either den or det. There are a few more rules and exceptions for this, so be sure to check the lesson notes!
John: Let’s end the lesson with an example using the object “vase,” which is basically the same in Danish.
Nana: With a definite article, we can say - den høje vase, meaning “the tall vase,” and by adding an ending we can say - vasen, meaning “the vase.”
John: Again, check the lesson notes for more examples!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Nana: Hej hej!

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

DanishClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Listeners, we hope this review was helpful. Try describing what you are wearing in Danish!

DanishClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:10 PM
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Hello Roger.


Thank you for the fine comment.


I suggest that you're only "lukket inde i dit hus". To be "lukket ned" is similar to the English "closed down" like a shop or "shut down" like a machine.


I hope you're allowed to go outside again.


Best wishes


Marc

Team DanishClass101.com

Roger
Sunday at 03:36 PM
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Jeg har en ternet skjorte, sorte shorts og en blå kedeldragt på. Desværre er jeg lukket ned inde i mit lille hus.

DanishClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:21 AM
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Hej Gabi.


Thanks for your comment. Good description. Hope you will keep learning Danish.


Linda

Team DanishClass101.com

Gabi
Thursday at 10:16 PM
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Hej! Det var meget sjov lektion! Jeg har en blå kjole og sort strømpebukser på.