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Lesson Transcript

Hej, jeg hedder [name]. Hi everybody! I’m [name].
Welcome to DanishClass101.com’s “Dansk på tre minutter”. The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Danish.
In the last lesson you learned the phrase Hvor meget koster det? ”How much is it?” In this lesson let’s see how we could answer that question by counting kroner in Danish. In Denmark the currency is the DKK.
Please pay attention to this word's pronunciation.
kroner.
Let’s try to say prices in Danish. Start by trying to say "26 kroner and 50 øre (cent)."
seksogtyve kroner og halvtreds øre.
[slowly] 26 kroner og 50 øre.
50 øre (cent) is the lowest Danish coin value, but you can still see prices like, ”167 kroner and 98 øre”, in stores. In Danish, this is...
hundredogsyvogtres kroner og otteoghalvfems øre.
[slowly] hundred og syvogtres kroner og otteoghalvfems øre.
Let’s try another example-
“30 kroner and 49 øre."
tredive kroner og niogfyrre øre.
[slowly] tredive kroner og niogfyrre øre.
This is rarely said out loud by the shop clerk, but will be shown in digits when you’re paying with credit card.
That takes a lot of effort to say, doesn’t it! You can shorten it in two ways. First, you don’t need to say “og” all the time. You also don’t have to say øre and kroner.
hundredsyvogtresotteoghalvfems. (167,98)
“a hundred and sixty seven, ninety eight”
Now it’s time for [name]’s Insights.
You will most likely hear the last short form from shop clerks. It’s easier and quicker to use. Also remember coins under 50 øre doesn’t exist anymore. So when you’re paying with cash, you round up or down to the closest 50 øre.
You should ask your friends in Denmark if they want to go shopping with you to practice these phrases! But first you’ll have to check if they have other plans or not. Do you know how to ask that in Danish? If not, I’ll see you in the next lesson!
På gensyn!

5 Comments

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DanishClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Let's try giving prices in Danish here!

Team DanishClass101.com
Monday at 08:41 PM
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Hi lacy,


Thank you for commenting.


Hope you will continue to enjoy learning Danish with us.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Thank you!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

lacy
Saturday at 07:41 AM
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wow thid thing really works i love it and its easy to use since im young:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye::thumbsup:

Team DanishClass101.com
Thursday at 09:48 AM
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Hi James,


Thank you for your comment and the short dialogue.


You are almost correct.


Instead of saying "Det er hundred kroner," you would usually say "Det koster hundred kroner."


Hope you will continue to enjoy learning Danish with us.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Thank you!


Amalie

Team DanishClass101.com

James
Monday at 09:41 AM
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I made a short dialogue. Is it correct? :smile:


Costumer: Hvor meget koster det?

Shop Employee: Det er hundred kroner.

Costumer: Tak.